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Top 10 Christmas Songs of All Time

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Dec 26, 2011 @11:46 AM

Top 10 Christmas Songs of All Time

 

By Jessica Brandon

 

Are you enjoying the holiday season so far? Here are the list of the top 10 Best Christmas songs of all time:

Bing Crosby

1. White Christmas - Bing Crosby

Written by Irving Berlin. This ultimate festive song that remains one of the world's biggest selling singles of all time. Bing first sang this classic in the movie “Holiday Inn”. This song has been covered by countless of music artists worldwide.

 

2. The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire) - Mel Torme

This annual Christmas crowd pleaser has been recorded over and over but Nat King Cole's 1946 original recording of Mel Torme's tune is still the ultimate version of this old favourite with his hot chocolate voice. You just want to wrap up warm, hold your loved ones in your arms and sip eggnog and gobble chestnuts. The tune is already the most-recorded holiday tune of the 21st century.

 

3. Do They Know It's Christmas Time - Band Aid

Phil Collins, Sting, George Michael, Boy George, Bono, the all-star list goes on and on. This charity classic has become a festive anthem and yet still serves up poignant lyrics about a world many of us know little about, and people we should champion and consider every year at this time.

 

4. Blue Christmas - Elvis Presley

The King crooned this Billy Hayes tune up a storm for his Christmas With Elvis EP in 1958 and it has been a chilly reminder of lonely yules ever since. The track has been recorded by 150 different artists but Elvis gives it an achingly cool twist.

 

5. All I Want Is Christmas Is You – Mariah Carey

It was released by Columbia Records onNovember 1, 1994as the lead single from her fourth studio album, Merry Christmas. The song was written by Carey and Walter Afanasieff, both of whom were also the producers. This song peaked at number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay chart

 

 6. Winter Wonderland - Doris Day

This holiday classic has been recorded by over 1,000 different artists but only Doris Day takes you off to the imaginary lanes and meadows in this festive favourite, where young lovers build snowmen, fall in love and warm their frozen bits by the fire.

 

7. Last Christmas - Wham!

George Michael's smooth tones and those Christmas bells offer us another festive heartbreaker as the British pop star recalls a romance gone bad.

 

8. Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow - Dean Martin

There's something about Dean Martin that just says Christmas to me - whether it's those lovely sweaters he used to wear, his love for a festive brew or the fact he's the eternal merry maker, I'm not sure but this jolly tune about keeping your loved one loved up as the storm bears down is a lovely romantic pop ditty.

 

9. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas – Various Artists

Another Christmas favourite that joins the one thousand club - for the amount of times it has been performed by different artists, this dreamy ballad conjures up all that is good and right about Christmas time. Tony Bennett, Toni Braxton and The Carpenters have all recorded terrific versions of this winter warmer but the late Rosemary Clooney nailed it.

 

10.  Peace On Earth - Bing Crosby + David Bowie

This makes the list just because it was such an odd but wonderful pairing - spacemanBowieand old timer Bing, the voice of Christmas. The odd couple teamed up to record this hit in the late 1970s for a TV Crosby Christmas Special and Bowie swears to this day he has no recollection of the performance.

 

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Best Christmas Songs of All Time, Bing Crosby, White Christmas, The Christmas Song, Mel Torme, Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire

Songwriter Joan Baez still loves the stage after 50 years

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Dec 12, 2011 @06:03 PM

 

Written by Bill Nutt

(Scource: NJ Press Media)

Joan Baez, Singer-Songwriter

This past January, Joan Baez turned 70. And like a number of her fellow septuagenarians (such as Bob Dylan, Judy Collins and Paul Simon), she still tours and performs.

No one is more surprised by that fact than Baez herself.

“Sometimes, I’m up on the stage, and I think that it’s crazy that I’m still doing this,” she says.

With a laugh, she adds, “And it’s crazy that you’re still coming to see me.”

Crazy or not, Baez continues to make music and continues to promote political and social activism. Her current tour brings her to the Mayo Performing Arts Center on Wednesday (Nov. 16).

The combination of social causes and music has been part of Baez’s public image since she started performing in coffeehouses in Cambridge, MA in the late 1950s. Only 17 years, she had already developed a social consciousness, in part because of her parents.

Her musical career began almost by accident, according to Baez. Her first instrument was the ukulele, followed by the guitar.

“I didn’t take (music) seriously,” she says. “My idea of the future was the following Wednesday. Planning was not my strong point.”

Nonetheless, Baez’s undeniably powerful soprano voice soon became familiar to aficionados of folk music, and her first three albums went gold. She championed other performers, including a young Bob Dylan. Gradually, she went from recording traditional folk songs to more politically tinged material.

In the 50 years since her debut album, Baez has occasionally had significant commercial success, notably her cover of the Band’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and the self-penned title track from her 1975 album “Diamonds and Rust.” But arguably her greatest strength has been covering material by singer-songwriters from Dylan to Mary-Chapin Carpenter and making it her own.

For example, her 2008 album “Day After Tomorrow” was produced by Steve Earle, who contributed three songs. She also covers songs by Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and T Bone Burnett.

“It sounds corny, but the song really finds me,” says Baez. “With the song ‘Day After Tomorrow’ (written by Waits), I really thought, ‘Oh, he wrote it for me.’ ”


With so much material from which to choose, planning her setlist is a challenge.

“It’s dicey business doing a concert,” she says. “If it’s a new song, it has to be one that catches the people’s attention right away.”

However, Baez also understands that some older songs can take on a deeper resonance. For example, inspired by Occupy Wall Street and related movements, she has resurrected her version of the Rolling Stones’ “Salt of the Earth” on her current tour.

“I think that Occupy Wall Street is one of the biggest surprises,” she says. “I don’t know if this would have happened without (uprisings) in Egypt and Tunisia, that showed how much power people can have.”

Still, Baez does not see herself as a starry-eyed optimist.

“I was always a realist,” she says. “Most things that are unpleasant don’t surprise. And I’m not discouraged, because I know newspapers and TV don’t always cover the good things that are happening.”

For her own part, Baez sees no reason to slow down either as an activist or as a performer.

“It’s true that I’ve lost some of my upper register,” she says. “But it’s made up by the fact that my voice contains 50 years of living.”

 

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Joan Baez, folk music