Songwriting Tips, News & More

12th Annual Songwriters Showcase During SXSW

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 18, 2014 @07:37 PM

 

 

USA Songwriting Competition hosted a Songwriters Showcase during SXSW in Austin, TX on March 14, 2014. It marks the 12th Annual Songwriters Showcase in which USA Songwriting Competition started way back in 2003 at then Borders Books and Music. The annual showcases has showcased up-and-coming songwriters. Notable past songwriters included: Kate Voegele (2005 USA Songwriting Competition 1st Prize winner, Billboard Top 10 Artist) who was signed to Interscope Records, Ari Gold (2007 Overall Grand Prize Winner), who hit Top 10 on the Billboard Charts after winning the Songwriting Competition and Jordan Zevon (2009 Overall Grand Prize Winner). 

Our 2014 edition included songwriters at Mozart's Coffee Roasters in Austin, Texas, such as:

Jackie Venson

Jackie Venson, songwriter

 

Andrea Pais

Andrea Pais, songwriter


Leni Stern (Honorable Mention Winner)

Leni Stern, songwriter

 

D.B. Rielly (Honorable Mention Winner)

D.B. Rielly, songwriter

 

Tony DeSare (First Prize Winner, Jazz)

Tony DeSare, songwriter


  

 

For more information on entering the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: 
http://www.songwriting.net/enter

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, Songwriters Showcase, songwrite, sxsw

USA Songwriting Competition Winner Hits #1 on Charts, Goes Platinum

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Mar 10, 2014 @03:12 PM

USA Songwriting Competition Winner Hits #1 On Billboard Charts

American Authors accepting their Platinum award
American Authors, the winner of the 18th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, is making huge waves this week with their new hit single 'Best Day Of My Life'. It has been gaining momentum, hitting #1 on the Billboard US Adult Pop Songs Charts, making it their first official #1 single. They beat the likes of mega-hit music acts such as One Direction, A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera, Lorde and Bastille. The song also hit #11 this week with a bullet on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.

On top of this, the song was certified Platinum today, meaning it sold a total of 1 million copies. They are the first USA Songwriting Competition winner to ever hit #1 and certified Platinum [by Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)]. 


From Unknown To Stardom
They entered the USA Songwriting Competition as unsigned independent band and came out winning the USA Songwriting Competition, getting signed and hitting the charts. They have also appeared on hit TV shows such as "Tonight Show with Jay Leno", "Conan O'Brien" and "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson".

American Authors also appeared on "The Ellen Show" performing this song last month.

The song is also featured in the hit movie "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" and featured on the hit TV show "The Voice" more than once with the top 5 finalists singing this currect hit song.

The song is written by Zac Barnett, Dave Rublin, Matt Sanchez, James Adam Shelley, Aaron Accetta and Shep Goodman. American Authors is an American indie rock band based in Brooklyn, New York, and who are signed to The Island Def Jam Music Group.

The band of brothers met at the Berklee College of music, and up until 2012 were known as The Blue Pages. Under this moniker, the group released two extended players, Anthropology and Rich With Love, both of which were met with enough interest to keep the band relevant.

They won overall grand prize and first prize (Rock/Alternative) with their song ‘Believer’. This song appears as the first track in their full length album "Oh, What a Life", released this week on March 3rd.

 

About USA Songwriting Competition
USA Songwriting Competition has a long history of having winners getting recording and publishing contracts, have their songs placed on the charts as well as having their songs placed on film and television. The top two winners of 2011: Nenna Yvonne and Alexander Cardinale were signed to Interscope Records after their win. The 2007 winner hit Top 10 on the Billboard charts with his winning song. The 2005 Winner of the Country category had his winning song cut by Country Superstar Faith Hill. The 2005 winner of the Pop category was signed by Interscope Records; she went on to hit Top 10 on the Billboard 200 Album charts. Our 2008 winner appeared on David Letterman TV show and was signed to a record label.

For more information on entering the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit:
http://www.songwriting.net/enter

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Billboard Charts, Billboard Top 40 Hit

Songwriting Tip: Grammar Matters

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Mar 03, 2014 @10:15 AM

Songwriting Tip: Grammar Matters

 by Harriet Schock

Harriet Schock, hit songwriter

Yes, I meant that both ways. I’m writing on matters of grammar and I’m also writing in case grammar matters. So for a songwriter, when does it matter? Well, I suppose that depends upon your target audience. If you’re a novelist, it always matters. That’s why book writers have editors. Today, even a great storyteller may make the usual grammatical errors, especially if he went to school in the last decade or so. But even if a person has been taught in the best English class there is, he may make the usual mistakes. His brain is simply Teflon where the rules of grammar are concerned.

 

So who is the target audience for your songs? Does it matter to your listeners if you make sense? If communication is desirable, then grammar is very helpful because it actually helps a person be clear. And if you’re performing in a club, you’d better not lose the listener because your communication wandered off into the woods. Grammar can help keep you in sync with your listener.

Now I’m not talking about “proper speech” that would prohibit you from being colloquial. Technically it’s “whom are you kidding?” But no one in his right mind would say that in a song. It’s not the way people talk. One of my biggest hits had the word “ain’t” in the title and used a double negative. I did it on purpose. So I’m not being a purist. I’m just trying to make the point, for instance, that if you said “I lay here and drink my coffee” some people would be confused, because “lay” is the past tense of “lie.” So how could you be lying here yesterday and drinking your coffee today? So technically, it’s “I lie here and drink my coffee” or “I lay here and drank my coffee.” The whole lie/lay thing is confusing to people but it’s simply a matter of whether it’s something you do (lie) or something you do to an object or person (lay). You lay the book on the table. You lie on the bed.  Eventually the dictionary will simply put “lay” as a synonym with “lie” because usage dictates meaning. (That’s how we’re losing the difference between “imply” and “infer.”) But at the moment they don’t mean the same thing so if your target audience knows the difference between “lay” and “lie,” you’ve just lost some points by using it wrong. I know, I know “Lay lady lay” was wrong, but Dylan couldn’t very well say “Lie, lady lie.” To add to the confusion, “lie” has two meanings.

There are many examples of these grammatical pitfalls. For instance, if you’re making a lyric sheet for someone to look at, remember that “The book is on its side”—not “it’s side.” There are whole websites and discussion groups devoted to the fact that there is no apostrophe in the “possessive its.” Auto correct can get you in trouble when you’re texting because that thing wants to put apostrophes in everything. And while we’re talking about apostrophes, don’t use them to create a plural. It’s not “Come hear these singer’s.” The plural of “singer” is “singers” for heaven’s sakes. And don’t say “I have sang”—it’s “I have sung,” just like “I have drunk,” not “I have drank.” Bad grammar may not affect how well you sing, but it’s enough to drive a literate person to drink. And who knows? You might just have some literate folks in your target audience. 

 

Harriet Schock wrote the words and music to the Grammy-nominated #1 hit for Helen Reddy, "Ain't No Way To Treat A Lady" plus many songs for other artists, TV shows and films. She co-wrote the theme for “Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks,” currently showing in 30 countries. She and her band were featured in Henry Jaglom’s film “Irene In Time” performing 4 of Harriet’s songs. She also scored two other Jaglom films and is starring in the current movie “Just 45 Minutes from Broadway.“ Harriet is in the process of writing the songs for “Last of the Bad Girls,” a musical with book by Diane Ladd. Karen Black wrote the play, “Missouri Waltz,” around five of Harriet’s songs, which ran for 6 weeks at the Blank Theatre in Hollywood as well as in Macon, Georgia. Harriet teaches songwriting privately, in classes and a popular online course by private email. In 2007, Los Angeles Women In Music honored Harriet with their Career Achievement and Industry Contribution award. For her performance schedule, list of credits and samples of her work or information on he rbook (Becoming Remarkable, for Songwriters and Those Who Love Songs), her songwriting classes and consultation, go to:www.harrietschock.com

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to:http://www.songwriting.net

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