Songwriting Tips, News & More

Jessica Brandon

Recent Posts

Songwriting Tip: How to Keep Your Publisher, Manger, Agent, Producer & Label Happy

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Apr 16, 2014 @07:15 AM

How to Keep Your Publisher, Manger, Agent, Producer and Label Happy

By Molly-Ann Leikin, Song Marketing Consultant

Molly-Ann Leikin, hit songwriter

You’ve heard of the running of the bulls in Pampola?  When you’re famous, that’s exactly how people will stampede, tripping over themselves and killing their young, desperate to give you whatever you want.  They’ll take all of your calls before you even make them, answer your texts instantly, come to your parties, early, with cases of Cristal, and help your kids with their pre-school entrance essays.

Until then, while you’re still on your way up, and determined to catch someone’s life-changing ear, the job of making the population of your business entourage happy is all on you.  Period.

The good news:  your Publisher, Manager, Agent, Publicist, Label (PMAPL) can only make money when you do.  The bad news:  with sixteen hours in a work day, the bulk of their time is spent on The Guarantee.  If they represent artists who are making 18-wheelers stashed with cash right now, chances are good they won’t drop everything to put their team on your standby gig at Starbucks, North Eastern Outer Mongolia.  Know that.  Deal with it.  Don’t call and leave hate messages or deliver dead fish wrapped in the L.A. Times to their offices.  (Please note:  no fish, no newspapers.  That goes for all other dead protein, and periodicals, too.)

There are millions of talented people out there vying for your PMAPL’s time.  At this point, the person on the other side of the desk has all the power in your life.  Period.  Here’s how to keep your career moving forward, and eventually turn that all around in your favor. 

l. Set the ground rules with your PMAPL as to who will contact whom, and when.  Try to get a timeline commitment up front, so you don’t have to send the noodge mail, “R U shining me on or did U really die?”  Instead, suggest setting up a call once a month.  That’s fair and reasonable.        

2. Respect those ground rules.  When PMAPL’s start getting the “Where’s My Money” messages,  they will quickly lose interest and reassign your project to the back burner or the shredder altogether, preferring to work with professionals who respect other people’s time and priorities.

3. Don’t dump your drama on your PMAPL.  “Dude, my pick-up was booted, had to blow off my probation officer again, plus the kidlet is starting to look exactly like Arnold Schwartzenneger.”  You wouldn’t want anyone to lay that on you, right?  So only do and say what you would want to hear if you were on the PMAPL’s side of the desk.  Keep everything professional.

4.  Don’t try to get your PMAPL’s attention with ostentatious gifts.  You can’t afford the Bentleys they want.  At least not yet.  When you can, they’ll steal the needed funds, in plain sight, from your royalties.    

5. Remember that your PMAPL’s are your business partners.  They can only make money when you do.  Let them do their jobs for you.  Yours is to write/sing/perform, and attend every industry function, shaking hands, smiling, gathering business cards, asking when it would be convenient for you to call. 

6. Hang this on your fridge.

  © 2014 Molly-Ann Leikin  www.songmd.com  [email protected]

Molly-Ann Leikin (rhymes with bacon) created the Songwriting Consultation industry.  In the past five years, 6 of her clients have won Grammys.  Eleven more are Grammy nominees.  The author of “How To Write a Hit Song, Fifth Edition” and “How to Be a Hit Songwriter”, Molly is an Emmy nominee, has 15 gold and platinum records, taught songwriting at UCLA, and works by private consultation only.  She practices yoga, takes long, brisk walks and flosses, daily.   

Contact Molly for your Hit Song Marketing Consultation/Evaluation at [email protected]

 

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Molly-Ann Leikin, Song Marketing Consultant, record label, music publisher

Songwriting Tip : MAKE Your Song a Hit

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Apr 15, 2014 @06:21 AM

MAKE Your Song a Hit

 by Dave KusekSongwriter, songwriting

 

It’s one thing to write a hit song, but getting people to hear it is another story. There are thousands of “hit-worthy” songs out there that most people never even hear. It’s unfortunate, but you can start changing that trend by taking a more proactive role in the marketing of your song. This is an active business. Chance are you won’t randomly get found and thrust into the spotlight. You need to MAKE your song a hit. You’ll have to start small, but starting at all will put you ahead of the pack.

 

Make your song a Hit

 

Marketing the Process

The process of songwriting is one of the best opportunities to connect with an audience. Of course, if you’re writing songs with hopes they are used by another artist, this strategy may not be useful to you. Keep in mind though that unless you have a publisher with connections on your side, your song may never get to that high profile recording artist. Try your best to get that connection, but don’t make waiting a habit. Sitting on an unreleased song forever isn’t going to get you very far.

 

People love the process. Try posting “rough-drafts” of your song on YouTube or make Vine clips for Instagram or Twitter with short lyrical sections.

 

People love a story. I’m sure you’ve listened to lyrics and found yourself speculating about their meaning or what drove the songwriter to put those thoughts and emotions into song. Try writing blogs about the inspirations you’re feeling as you write. Stories give you the opportunity to connect with people on a level that goes beyond music. Maybe you experienced a profound event or a death. Maybe you have a passion for hiking and were inspired by that feeling of accomplishment you get at the top of a mountain. Whatever it is, people can connect with those stories. Tell yours. We want to hear it.

 

Stories that go beyond music also allow you to shine in a much less crowded space. In the music industry you’re just another songwriter in the crowd, but in the world of hiking you can be the star. Take this concept a step further and use those stories to get coverage for your song outside the music space. Eileen Quinn draws her inspiration from sailing and, as a result, was able to get coverage from sailing magazines and blogs.

 

These updates throughout the entire process keep you in the front of your fans minds.

 

Start Networking

 

Songwriters can sometimes feel isolated from the rest of the music industry. Recording and touring artists have to be out there interacting with people. You don’t have to stay behind the scenes - this year, make it a goal to get out there and meet people. Remember that this is a personal business. Emails aren’t going to cut it. Call people up, invite them to your show, meet them for coffee.

 

You don’t have to go on a full-blown tour, but try playing some smaller, singer-songwriter type gigs in more intimate environments where people can really connect with your song. Connect and collaborate with local bands. Maybe they’d be interested in covering one of your songs. Or, even better, maybe they know someone who could get your music in front of a publisher.

 

Try to get connections to people outside the traditional music industry. YouTube personalities, bloggers, and amateur photographers are just some of the options available to you. Many people who run YouTube channels are always looking for new music to use in the background of their videos. These people are tastemakers - their following really trusts their opinion - and just having your music there is enough to get their followers to check you out.

 

The key with everything is to start small. It takes time to get the opportunities that will really make your career. But writing a great song and just waiting for your big break won’t make a hit. Get out there, be proactive, and start taking the first steps towards the songwriting career you deserve.

 

About Dave Kusek:

If you’re ready to take a more active role in your own songwriting career, check out the New Artist Model online course. Sign up for the mailing list and get access to 5 free lessons.

 

 For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, hit songs, Dave Kusek

Songwriting: It’s Like Riding a Bicycle

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Apr 02, 2014 @10:31 AM

Songwriting: It’s Like Riding a Bicycle

Bicycle in your mindRemember when you learned to ride your first bicycle? It wasn’t easy. You fell down a lot, but you kept trying. At first you needed someone to hold on, keeping you steady. Then you used training wheels to help you stay upright as you pedaled. Then, finally, you were able to ride on your own. You had found that complicated thing called balance. After that, it was a breeze! The process of writing songs is a lot like riding a bike. It’s all about finding a balance!

=> Balance Melody, Chords, Lyrics – Writing a song that listeners will love involves finding a good balance between melody, lyrics, and chords. If you have a busy lyric with a lot of words and images then writing a melody that’s easy for listeners to follow might make it easier for them to understand and remember the song. It gives your song a chance to make a greater impact. When there’s too much going on, listeners miss important moments and they may just tune out.

The Singer-Songwriter genre, for example, is often lyric heavy and you’ll notice that, while the melodies make use of interesting phrase lengths and phrase starts, there are plenty of repeated melody patterns — lines repeated in sets of two, three, or four, organizing the melody so listeners can take it in easily while focusing on the lyrics. An extreme example of balance between lyrics and melody can be heard in the Rap genre. Lyric content and lyric rhythm have taken over, while the melody notes have become almost a monotone. 

On the other hand, if you have a complicated melody with a lot of rhythmic interest and interval jumps, try keeping your lyric straightforward and easy to follow, maybe use more repetition in your chorus lyric than you normally would.

A good rule of thumb: As the attention-grabbing quality of one of your song elements goes up – lyrics, melody, or chords – think about lowering the others. This doesn’t mean the other elements should become simple and predictable. Instead, try organizing them in patterns or using more repetition so listeners can focus on the more complicated things.

=> Study the balance in your genre – Each genre has a balance of melody, lyrics, and chords giving it a characteristic sound. For instance, the Pop genre tends to have plenty of melodic interest while keeping lyrics focused on an emotion, asking listeners to FEEL the lyrics rather than think about them. The Country genre, on the other hand, relies on lyric stories with plenty of physical detail. Listeners need to pay attention to the lyric in order to get the full impact. As a result, melodies tend to be a little less complex than in the Pop field. This doesn’t mean you can write a boring melody! You’ll still need to keep your listeners interested. But you might want to use fewer melodic twists than you would in the Pop genre.

=> Balance craft and inspiration – Balance is also an essential part of your approach to songwriting as a whole. Finding a balance between inspiration and song craft can help you express your deepest thoughts and feelings and in a way that listeners can understand and respond to.

Inspiration is the heart of your songwriting. It’s what guides you, tells you what’s important, and delivers that brilliant line out of the blue. But inspiration can be a very personal thing and it may not always be there when you need it. Sometimes it can even deliver inspired lines for a different song! But, if you balance it with a good amount of song craft, you can get the most from your inspiration, communicating effectively and surrounding those inspired gems with lines that support them.

=> It takes time to find your balance – Just like riding a bicycle, it takes practice to learn what good songwriting balance feels like. When you learn a new melody or lyric writing technique, don’t expect to immediately fold it into your songs and smoothly ride off into the sunset. There’ll be some wobbles and falls. You might scrape your knees a few times. But, just like you did when you were a kid, get back up on your bike and try again. Once you get the feel, you’ll be flying down the sidewalk with the wind in your hair in no time!

=> Get some training wheels – The best songwriting “training wheels” are hit songs. These songs already have good balance, the kind that listeners are comfortable with. This week, learn how to play and sing one recent hit song that you like. (You can find the current radio charts at BDSradio.com.) Notice the balance between lyrics, melody, and chords. How is the melody organized? Which melody lines are repeated and how many times? When do the lyrics simply repeat and when do they demand attention? Try writing a song with a similar type of balance.

Best of all, like riding a bike, once you learn what balance feels like you never forget!

by Robin Frederick

Robin Frederick has written more than 500 songs for television, records, theater, and audio products. She is a former Director of A&R for Rhino Records, Executive Producer of 60 albums, and the author of “Shortcuts to Hit Songwriting” and “Shortcuts to Songwriting for Film & TV” available at Amazon.com. Visit Robin's websites for more songwriting tips and inspiration: www.RobinFrederick.com  and www.MySongCoach.com.

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Robin Frederick, inspiration

12th Annual Songwriters Showcase During SXSW

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 18, 2014 @07:37 PM

 

 

USA Songwriting Competition hosted a Songwriters Showcase during SXSW in Austin, TX on March 14, 2014. It marks the 12th Annual Songwriters Showcase in which USA Songwriting Competition started way back in 2003 at then Borders Books and Music. The annual showcases has showcased up-and-coming songwriters. Notable past songwriters included: Kate Voegele (2005 USA Songwriting Competition 1st Prize winner, Billboard Top 10 Artist) who was signed to Interscope Records, Ari Gold (2007 Overall Grand Prize Winner), who hit Top 10 on the Billboard Charts after winning the Songwriting Competition and Jordan Zevon (2009 Overall Grand Prize Winner). 

Our 2014 edition included songwriters at Mozart's Coffee Roasters in Austin, Texas, such as:

Jackie Venson

Jackie Venson, songwriter

 

Andrea Pais

Andrea Pais, songwriter


Leni Stern (Honorable Mention Winner)

Leni Stern, songwriter

 

D.B. Rielly (Honorable Mention Winner)

D.B. Rielly, songwriter

 

Tony DeSare (First Prize Winner, Jazz)

Tony DeSare, songwriter


  

 

For more information on entering the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: 
http://www.songwriting.net/enter

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, Songwriters Showcase, songwrite, sxsw

USA Songwriting Competition Winner Hits #1 on Charts, Goes Platinum

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Mar 10, 2014 @03:12 PM

USA Songwriting Competition Winner Hits #1 On Billboard Charts

American Authors accepting their Platinum award
American Authors, the winner of the 18th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, is making huge waves this week with their new hit single 'Best Day Of My Life'. It has been gaining momentum, hitting #1 on the Billboard US Adult Pop Songs Charts, making it their first official #1 single. They beat the likes of mega-hit music acts such as One Direction, A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera, Lorde and Bastille. The song also hit #11 this week with a bullet on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.

On top of this, the song was certified Platinum today, meaning it sold a total of 1 million copies. They are the first USA Songwriting Competition winner to ever hit #1 and certified Platinum [by Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)]. 


From Unknown To Stardom
They entered the USA Songwriting Competition as unsigned independent band and came out winning the USA Songwriting Competition, getting signed and hitting the charts. They have also appeared on hit TV shows such as "Tonight Show with Jay Leno", "Conan O'Brien" and "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson".

American Authors also appeared on "The Ellen Show" performing this song last month.

The song is also featured in the hit movie "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" and featured on the hit TV show "The Voice" more than once with the top 5 finalists singing this currect hit song.

The song is written by Zac Barnett, Dave Rublin, Matt Sanchez, James Adam Shelley, Aaron Accetta and Shep Goodman. American Authors is an American indie rock band based in Brooklyn, New York, and who are signed to The Island Def Jam Music Group.

The band of brothers met at the Berklee College of music, and up until 2012 were known as The Blue Pages. Under this moniker, the group released two extended players, Anthropology and Rich With Love, both of which were met with enough interest to keep the band relevant.

They won overall grand prize and first prize (Rock/Alternative) with their song ‘Believer’. This song appears as the first track in their full length album "Oh, What a Life", released this week on March 3rd.

 

About USA Songwriting Competition
USA Songwriting Competition has a long history of having winners getting recording and publishing contracts, have their songs placed on the charts as well as having their songs placed on film and television. The top two winners of 2011: Nenna Yvonne and Alexander Cardinale were signed to Interscope Records after their win. The 2007 winner hit Top 10 on the Billboard charts with his winning song. The 2005 Winner of the Country category had his winning song cut by Country Superstar Faith Hill. The 2005 winner of the Pop category was signed by Interscope Records; she went on to hit Top 10 on the Billboard 200 Album charts. Our 2008 winner appeared on David Letterman TV show and was signed to a record label.

For more information on entering the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit:
http://www.songwriting.net/enter

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Billboard Charts, Billboard Top 40 Hit

Songwriting Tip: Grammar Matters

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Mar 03, 2014 @10:15 AM

Songwriting Tip: Grammar Matters

 by Harriet Schock

Harriet Schock, hit songwriter

Yes, I meant that both ways. I’m writing on matters of grammar and I’m also writing in case grammar matters. So for a songwriter, when does it matter? Well, I suppose that depends upon your target audience. If you’re a novelist, it always matters. That’s why book writers have editors. Today, even a great storyteller may make the usual grammatical errors, especially if he went to school in the last decade or so. But even if a person has been taught in the best English class there is, he may make the usual mistakes. His brain is simply Teflon where the rules of grammar are concerned.

 

So who is the target audience for your songs? Does it matter to your listeners if you make sense? If communication is desirable, then grammar is very helpful because it actually helps a person be clear. And if you’re performing in a club, you’d better not lose the listener because your communication wandered off into the woods. Grammar can help keep you in sync with your listener.

Now I’m not talking about “proper speech” that would prohibit you from being colloquial. Technically it’s “whom are you kidding?” But no one in his right mind would say that in a song. It’s not the way people talk. One of my biggest hits had the word “ain’t” in the title and used a double negative. I did it on purpose. So I’m not being a purist. I’m just trying to make the point, for instance, that if you said “I lay here and drink my coffee” some people would be confused, because “lay” is the past tense of “lie.” So how could you be lying here yesterday and drinking your coffee today? So technically, it’s “I lie here and drink my coffee” or “I lay here and drank my coffee.” The whole lie/lay thing is confusing to people but it’s simply a matter of whether it’s something you do (lie) or something you do to an object or person (lay). You lay the book on the table. You lie on the bed.  Eventually the dictionary will simply put “lay” as a synonym with “lie” because usage dictates meaning. (That’s how we’re losing the difference between “imply” and “infer.”) But at the moment they don’t mean the same thing so if your target audience knows the difference between “lay” and “lie,” you’ve just lost some points by using it wrong. I know, I know “Lay lady lay” was wrong, but Dylan couldn’t very well say “Lie, lady lie.” To add to the confusion, “lie” has two meanings.

There are many examples of these grammatical pitfalls. For instance, if you’re making a lyric sheet for someone to look at, remember that “The book is on its side”—not “it’s side.” There are whole websites and discussion groups devoted to the fact that there is no apostrophe in the “possessive its.” Auto correct can get you in trouble when you’re texting because that thing wants to put apostrophes in everything. And while we’re talking about apostrophes, don’t use them to create a plural. It’s not “Come hear these singer’s.” The plural of “singer” is “singers” for heaven’s sakes. And don’t say “I have sang”—it’s “I have sung,” just like “I have drunk,” not “I have drank.” Bad grammar may not affect how well you sing, but it’s enough to drive a literate person to drink. And who knows? You might just have some literate folks in your target audience. 

 

Harriet Schock wrote the words and music to the Grammy-nominated #1 hit for Helen Reddy, "Ain't No Way To Treat A Lady" plus many songs for other artists, TV shows and films. She co-wrote the theme for “Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks,” currently showing in 30 countries. She and her band were featured in Henry Jaglom’s film “Irene In Time” performing 4 of Harriet’s songs. She also scored two other Jaglom films and is starring in the current movie “Just 45 Minutes from Broadway.“ Harriet is in the process of writing the songs for “Last of the Bad Girls,” a musical with book by Diane Ladd. Karen Black wrote the play, “Missouri Waltz,” around five of Harriet’s songs, which ran for 6 weeks at the Blank Theatre in Hollywood as well as in Macon, Georgia. Harriet teaches songwriting privately, in classes and a popular online course by private email. In 2007, Los Angeles Women In Music honored Harriet with their Career Achievement and Industry Contribution award. For her performance schedule, list of credits and samples of her work or information on he rbook (Becoming Remarkable, for Songwriters and Those Who Love Songs), her songwriting classes and consultation, go to:www.harrietschock.com

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Harriet Schock, Grammar

Oscars Songwriting 2014: Who Will Win Best Original Song Race?

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Feb 26, 2014 @08:51 AM

Oscars 2014: Who Will Win Best Original Song Race?

Competition this year is between four nominated songs: "Happy," "Let It Go," "The Moon Song" and "Ordinary Love." The 86th Academy Awards will take place March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles.

The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is presented to the songwriters who have composed the best original song written specifically for a film. The performers of a song are not credited with the Academy Award unless they contributed either to music, lyrics or both in their own right.

 

1) "Let It Go" from Frozen
Music and Lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
Performed by Broadway sensation Idina Menzel

 

2) "Ordinary Love" from Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
Music by Paul Hewson (Bono), Dave Evans, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen; Lyric by Paul Hewson (Bono). 
Performed by U2

 

3) "Happy" from Despicable Me 2
Music and Lyrics by Pharrell Williams
Performed by Pharrell Williams
Pharrell Williams is on a roll. He was featured in two of last year’s biggest songs, just swept the Grammys with four wins.

4) "The Moon Song" from Her
Music by Karen O; Lyric by Karen O and Spike Jonze
Performed by Karen O

 

 

Surprising Songs That Did Not Make Past Oscars

Songs that were published prior to a film's production having nothing to do with the film, such as "Unchained Melody" in the 1990 film Ghost and "I Will Always Love You" in the 1992 film The Bodyguard, cannot qualify (although "Unchained Melody" was nominated when first released for the 1955 film Unchained). In addition, songs that rely on sampled or reworked material, such as "Gangsta's Paradise" in the 1995 film Dangerous Minds, are also ineligible.

 

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Oscars, academy awards best song, oscars best song

Songwriting Tip: The NO Free Zone

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Feb 24, 2014 @10:18 AM

CO-WRITING: THE NO FREE ZONE

By Pat Pattison

Pat Pattison, Songwriting Professor from Berklee College of Music

The best advice I ever got on co-writing was from Stan Webb, my first professional co-writer. When Tom Casey, a VP at SESAC in Nashville, set the appointment up for me, he asked Stan to talk to me a bit about the Nashville co-writing process, a process that dominates the songwriting culture there.

I was waiting in the SESAC writer's room with my notes and titles, some complete lyrics, song ideas, and I was feeling nervous. I, after all, am a big-time Professor at the biggest time music school in the world - Berklee, where I teach lyric writing. What if I can't come up with anything? What if he thinks all my ideas are dumb? They don't look too good to me right now either... What if he thinks I'm a fraud? Not only would that humiliate me, but it would put my students' credibility in question too, and it'd be all my fault. Why am I here? Maybe I should leave while there's still time. Couldn't I say I have food poisoning?

Too late. The door opened and there stood Stan Webb, my co-writer for the day, a guy with hits. Stan is a burly guy. He looked a bit shaggy, wearing bib overalls, a tattered t-shirt, and work boots, looking like he'd just come off the farm (which, in fact, he had--he owns one, bought with songwriting royalties). He came in and did something curious: he shut the door, re-opened it, shut it again and then pushed hard to make sure it was closed. Hmmmm. Was he worried about folks listening and stealing our good ideas? I was deeply concerned just with having a good idea. It would have been a relief to have an idea good enough that a secret listener would want it.

He sat down opposite me on a couch and seemed to size me up. He grinned and said, "Is that door closed?" Yikes. "Yes it is," I answered carefully, not knowing where he was going with this. Was it a secret initation? "Good, I'm glad it's closed," he said, "because you can probably tell by looking at me that I'm gonna say some of the dumbest things you've ever heard." I stayed quiet. I was more worried about what he thought of me. He went on, "And if you do your job right today, you're gonna say some of the dumbest thing I ever heard, professor or not." "No doubt there," I thought. He grinned again and said, "But, as long as that door is closed, nobody needs to know how dumb both of us are. I won't tell if you don't."

He told me that he hoped I didn't mind, but Tom had asked him to talk to me about the co-writing process in Nashville, so he wanted to tell me just a couple things before we got going on a song. I told him to take his time.

He said, "SAY EVERYTHING that comes to your head. Say it out loud, no matter how dumb it is. Don't censor anything. If you say something really dumb, you might give me an idea that's not quite as dumb. And then I might have a decent one that gives you a better one that gives me a great one. If you'd never said the dumb one, we would never get to the great one."

"So that means that we'll never say "no" to each other. A co-writing room is a "NO" FREE ZONE. If you say something and I don't like it, I just won't say anything. Silence is a request for more, more, more. It says 'just keep throwing stuff out there.' When either one of us likes something, we'll say YES. Otherwise, just keep going."

We had a great writing session. I lost my fear of looking like a fool. I came up with a lot of dumb ideas, and my dumbest idea of all led us to the best part of the song. We really did say everything. And the silences were golden - what a great way to ensure that we always get the best out of each other: nobody has to defend anything, and the only ideas that make it into the song are automatically ones we both like. The "NO" FREE ZONE gets the best out of both writers: there are no arguments, and there never needs to be compromise.

I've always been grateful to Stan for his wise advice that day. It helps me every time I co-write, but also every time I write. My inner critic (most frequent co-writer) has also learned to abide by the "NO" FREE ZONE. And Stan's words still echo in the songwriting classrooms at Berklee College of Music, where literally hundreds of students have worked in the "NO" FREE ZONE and have had great co-writing experiences because of it.

Thanks buddy.

I've added some advice of my own to Stan's, because, in Berklee writing classes, we talk ABOUT writing a lot. Lots of process, lots of techniques. And it really helps their writing, learning about what goes into it - what tools are available. My students learn to talk about writing very well. They are good technicians as well as good writers.

Thus, my advice: never talk about writing in a co-writing room, especially about technique. You're supposed to be writing, not talking about it. Stay inside the song, inside the characters. Don't run away to the intellectual level. Most people are tempted to talk about those wonderful technical effects in their lines - assonance, rhythm, deep thoughts or metaphors-- out of fear -- to cover their bases and try to dress up what they're afraid might be a dumb idea, in academic robes. A dumb idea is still dumb, even with professorial robes on. Just write. And write fearlessly.

One final thought: in terms of SAYING EVERYTHING, I hereby grant you permission to write crap. Lots of it; all the time; the more the better. Remember: crap makes the best fertilizer.

 

Pat Pattison is a professor at the famed Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA, USA. 

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, collaborator, Songwriting Tip, co-writing, Berklee Pat Pattison

Songwriting Tip: Obscurity vs Clarity

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Jan 29, 2014 @11:03 AM

Obscurity vs Clarity

By Harriet Schock

Harriet Schock, Hit songwriter

I believe that there’s an invisible line that goes from the mouth of the singer to the ears and heart of the listener and if that line is broken by a lyric that makes no sense, the listener’s attention leaves.

Of course, there are many examples of songs that make no sense and have been hits, but when you cite these as examples, I would ask: 1) Was the melody and harmony so killer that people loved it in spite of the lack of clarity? 2) Was it sung by someone so famous that anything they put out will become a hit? 3) Was the audience chemically altered so that each song and bite was better than the one before, no matter what they were hearing or eating?

I have taught songwriting since 1986 and occasionally I’ll have a student who announces he wants to write an obscure song. And granted sometimes songs in films can be a bit generic so that the story takes place on the screen, not in the lyric. But even there the lyrics need to make sense.  I find that thetwo most common reasons for someone’s wanting to write an obscure, ambiguous lyric are: 1) His craft is limited and he thinks he’s being clear when he’s not or 2) He’s not willing for the real story to come out for personal reasons.

There’s a vast difference between writing on two levels and being ambiguous. I believe songs should make sense when you first hear them. Then upon second and third listening, deeper meaning can be discovered. Ambiguity generally leaves the listener wondering what you actually meant.

All of this has been about the lyric. But needless to say, the melody and harmony (chords) are vitally important. They are the wavelengths that carry the lyric along that invisible line I mentioned earlier. Obscurity breaks the line, but a weak melody completely dissolves it.

As performers we can tell when we have a strong melody, compelling harmony and a lyric that moves the listener. That’s when the audience is very quiet and attentive. Sometimes they cry, and we like that too.

Harriet Schock wrote the words and music to the Grammy-nominated #1 hit for Helen Reddy, "Ain't No Way To Treat A Lady" plus many songs for other artists, TV shows and films. She co-wrote the theme for “Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks,” currently showing in 30 countries. She and her band were featured in Henry Jaglom’s film “Irene In Time” performing 4 of Harriet’s songs. She also scored two other Jaglom films and is starring in the current movie “Just 45 Minutes from Broadway.“ Harriet is in the process of writing the songs for “Last of the Bad Girls,” a musical with book by Diane Ladd. Karen Black wrote the play, “Missouri Waltz,” around five of Harriet’s songs, which ran for 6 weeks at the Blank Theatre in Hollywood as well as in Macon, Georgia. Harriet teaches songwriting privately, in classes and a popular online course by private email. In 2007, Los Angeles Women In Music honored Harriet with their Career Achievement and Industry Contribution award. For her performance schedule, list of credits and samples of her work or information on herbook (Becoming Remarkable, for Songwriters and Those Who Love Songs), her songwriting classes and consultation, go to: www.harrietschock.com.

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, hit songwriter, songwrite, Harriet Schock, Songwriters Tip, singer songwriter, top 40

Songwriting Tip: The Backyard Connection

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Jan 23, 2014 @09:49 AM

The Backyard Connection

by Mark Cawley

Back Yard Musicians Songwriters

If you've been writing songs for awhile you have to have heard someone preach about the value of networking and getting connected.

Pretty much a given, you can create in a vacuum but you can't grow there.You may be all alone in your room and in your head when you create but to get that song (and you as a writer) in front of people it takes more people. More people means connecting and more connecting. Takes a village to raise a hit. Where to start?

Scour the village!

What does that look like for a beginning writer or a writer living outside of a major music center? It takes some digging on your part. For instance, I coach songwriters from all over the US and beyond these days and many live in places like Indiana, just to pick one. I urge them to look for a local resource first. If you write lyrics but don't play an instrument see if you can connect with someone who's a good player. If you're a songwriter but don't have production skills look for someone around you who's making magic in the basement. Grow together.

One of my favorite ways to connect in these cases is to, in the words of John Hiatt "pull my pony up and hitch my wagon to your star". Is there someone you've heard in a local club? Online? At church? Who's a diamond in the rough? Connect with them. So many writers made a career of working with an unsigned artist and as the artist gained attention, as good ones tend to do, the songwriter’s name was attached. I'm not just suggesting you pitch your songs to this budding artist but suggest you offer to co-write. Get them invested in the song and as they rise so will you. Not every artist we know and love came from LA, New York or London. Some of them came from small towns and for the sake of my point, the pride of Seymour, Indiana, John Mellencamp.

 

I Was Born In A Small Town

I know John a bit from my days of playing in Indiana and most of the people connected to him in the beginning were all local players. The guys I saw in the local bars where the same ones I saw years later at the LA Forum. Some of his earliest hits were co-written with a local lyricist named George Green. John worked with what he had around him.

Sure the odds go up if you move to one of the cities I mentioned and put yourself out there but in the meantime make the most of what's right in your backyard. Might seem like a small connection but it just might be the one to hitch your pony to. Oh yeah, one more Hoosier...John Hiatt.

 

Got Nothing Against the big Town

In defense of the writers and artists that make the big leap to a major market, most of the ones I know worked hard at making and keeping connections. One of my favorite illustrations would be the number of them that offered to sing demos for songwriters, sometimes cheap, hoping that as the writers song gets heard someone will discover the singer. In my first few years in Nashville it was common for me to call some of these folks like Gretchen Wilson, Brett James, Clay Davidson, Ruby Amanfu and Neil Thrasher to sing a demo for me. Worked out pretty well for me and for them.

No matter how you get your break, you never stop connecting on any level in this business you chose.

 Mark Cawley, songwriter

Mark Cawley

Nashville, Tennessee

1/15/14

Photo: Google Images

About: 

Mark Cawley's songs have appeared on more than 15 million records. Over a career based in LA, London, and Nashville his songs have been recorded by an incredibly diverse range of artists. From Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross and Chaka Khan to The Spice Girls, Tom Scott, Kathy Mattea, Paul Carrack, Will Downing and Pop Idol winners in the UK. He has had #1 records in the UK and throughout Europe as well as cuts in Country, Jazz & R & B. His groundbreaking website Song Journey created with Hall of Fame writer Kye Fleming was the first to mentor writers from around the world one-on-one online. He is currently writing and publishing as well as helping writers and artists worldwide with a one-on-one co-active coaching service, iDoCoach.

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

 

 

 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Mark Cawley, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross