Songwriting Tips, News & More

Jessica Brandon

Recent Posts

Five Steps To Improve Your Songwriting

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Apr 14, 2010 @12:43 PM

by Ira Greenfield

I have been asked so many times how do you write a good song. Here are five main ways you can use to your advantage:

1. Song Structure
We have received many songs at the USA Songwriting Competition. Many songs received are free-formed and hard to follow. Every good song has a good structure such as AABA or Verse/Refrain. Structure such as: verse leads to the chorus back to the verse and then chorus, bridge and lastly chorus is probably the most popular. Let’s stick to what works and then break the rules once you are good at it.

2. Compose Good Lyrics
I like songs with a good story or lyrics that actually say something. Avoid cliches such as “I’ll never break your heart, I’ll never tear you apart”, words like that has been done before and you want to say it in a different angle. Write lyrics that would bring imagery to the listener as well as a hook to it. You want a theme to begin with it. A good idea is “Unbreak My Heart”, this shows great sense of craft and artistry even in the title itself. In this case, the writer “created” a word “Unbreak”. If it was “Don’t Break My Heart”, it would have been quite ordinary and would not have the same effect.

3. Compose Good Melodies
Many songs we received sound more improvisational than actual composition. You have to sit down to sculpt out a melody for the verse and a melody or hook for the chorus. You want to make the melody chorus sound memorable and sound a little different from the verse. Good melodies are found in the current hit “Need You Now” by Lady Antebellum. The bang on chorus is catchy and well thought out.

4. Developing good chord structure and background music.
You need a good chord progression to go with your melody. It doesn’t matter which come first and it doesn’t matter if you collaborate with someone who is a keyboardist, guitarist or producer who writes a great chord progression or produces a music “bed” for you to write your melody. There is no secret many hit songwriters/artists do it this way: Jason Derülo, Beyoncé, Mariah Carey have all written songs this way by going over a piece of background music.

5. Artistry And Intangibles
This is probably the hardest to come by. Iconic songs such as “Boom Boom Pow” by Black Eye Peas, “Poker Face” by Lady Ga Ga, “Californication” by Red Hot Chilli Peppers, “Believe” by Cher, “Angie” by Rolling Stones, “My Way” by Paul Anka are examples of songs that have been composed and re-composed over many times before the song can be recorded. Love them or hate them, there is a sense of artistry in each an every one of these songs. I would suggest focus on what you are good at: If you are good at say writing music but not so good at writing lyrics, I would suggest hooking up with a lyricist, someone who can write good lyrics.

Ira Greenfield works in business development at USA Songwriting Competition. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, please visit: http://www.songwriting.net.

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting Tips, improve your songwriting skills

Songwriting Tips: Seven Easy Steps to Write Hit Lyrics

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Sun, Mar 28, 2010 @09:19 AM

by Molly-Ann Leikin, Songwriting Consultant


How To Write A Hit Song

I've written poems and I've written lyrics. I've learned if you can do one, you can usually do the other. As a poet, I've enjoyed the pure creative process, and the occasional publication of my work.

But I've never made a dime writing a poem. Ever.

On the other hand, I live very comfortably on my lyric royalties. And it beats working.

In my practice as a songwriting consultant in California, I hear almost every other new client tell me he or she can't write lyrics. To help them, I've developed a seven-step system, and it works.

If you're a poet who's tired of being broke, and would like to occasionally use your gifts to write more commercially, this article can help you make that transition. It can also help lyricists who are stuck, composers who claim they write music only, plus the entire world of left-brain computer types who ache to create something romantic—like a song.

When writing one, be aware that melodies are open to interpretation - so when you write a tune, what you feel or intend is still safe in your heart.You don't have to reveal yourself or stand completely naked in front of the world. But once you put words to a tune, your feelings are totally out in the open and everyone knows what's in your heart. Therefore, it can be very inhibiting to write lyrics, which is often why writers get stuck.

But here is the process I use with my clients to make lyric writing simple. I suggest you use all seven steps. Cutting corners is usually why a lyric doesn't work.

Most poets and beginning songwriters make the mistake of writing acres of lines of iambic pentameter and then set out to look for someone who can turn that dreary rhythm into an exciting melody. Almost nobody can, no matter what the words are saying. So don't write your lyrics first. ]Get the tune, then write the words. So let's assume, for this exercise, that you have a melody but no idea of what to say in your lyric. Don't worry if you don't have a tune. I'll give you one.

STEP 1. Sing or play the tune of a nursery rhyme. Any of them will do: Baa Baa Black Sheep, Humpty Dumpty, Ring Around the Rosie - it doesn't matter which you choose. Use this melody for practice. As you listen to it, scribble down some non-rhyming prose. Ignore the exact notes, but listen to the feelings. Let your words be a stream-of-conscious exercise to warm up your imagination. Don't use rhymes or logic. Try to be visual, silly, playful and have fun with it.
Here's an example of some lines I scribbled down after listening to "Itsy Bitsy Spider":

A former tooth farmer from Fluffy, South Apricot, dug through Exxon's banana shoe hairbrush section for kangaroo lingerie, after the De La Hoya/Pope Potato wrist rake from Western Tire Cough Drops slid unnoticed into burping toenails.

STEP 2. Now please write a silly, visual non-rhyming lyric to your tune. Match each note with one syllable. Fill your non-rhyming lyric with ridiculous pictures. Again, don't be logical, don't make it make sense. Every line can be about something different. The first might concern shoe repair, the second, airport parking. In this draft, try to keep all the rhymes OUT. Here's an example of a nonsense lyric I wrote, to the tune of "Jack and Jill".
Lizards frying Jaguars
All hum Hawaiin shoe trees
Disneyland will hiccup in
The mayor's purple phone soup.

STEP 3. Now write an uncensored list of silly titles that will fit with the stresses of the first line of your nursery rhyme. No matter how many notes in that line, keep your title to seven syllables or less. Shoot for twenty or thirty possible titles. Don't write anything you've heard before. Let your imagination roll. Don't say, "Oh, that's dumb." Write it all down. You might find one of these nonsense titles could actually turn into a real one later. "I Love You" is fine, but Jewel's "Swallow The Moon" gets you in the gut. A good title will write the whole song for you. A mediocre one will leave you stranded in line two.
Here are some nonsense titles I wrote to the tune of
"Jack and Jill":

Santa knit a Hershey Bar
Orange dancing astronauts
Drinking bricks can make you skate

STEP 4. Write a few real titles with the same number of syllables as your silly ones. Here are some I wrote to
"Jack and Jill":
Sundays with the London Times
Do you ever think of me
Moonlight over Lake O'Hare

STEP 5. Choose one of your real titles. Write the story it tells in prose. Just a couple of sentences will do fine. Writing the story as a letter might be easier for you. If any lines come out rhyming, change them so they don't. That way, you'll be able to express yourself with complete freedom, and without the constraints of rhyme or meter.
When you finish this step, you'll know the beginning, middle and end of your story before you start to write the lyric. Most songs have two verses, a chorus and a bridge, so allow space for them in your story. By writing it first, you'll be able to see if you have enough information to fill a whole song, so you won't get stuck half-way through with nowhere to go. You can always cut out words and lines later.

STEP 6. Using the information from your story, write a non-rhyming lyric to the nursery rhyme melody you've chosen. Should rhymes mysteriously appear, delete them.

STEP 7. Now write the "real" lyric, with the story and the rhymes.


I suggest you do all seven steps. Not four, not two. Seven. My clients who don't are still claiming they can't write lyrics. But many of my songwriters who do are climbing the charts.
The more lyrics you write, the easier it gets. So please do this exercise five times, each with a different nursery rhyme. Once you learn how to map out a lyric, and write it to a melody, you're 90% there.
© 2010 Molly-Ann Leikin
www.songmd.com
Molly-Ann Leikin (rhymes with bacon) is a songwriting consultant with dozens of gold and platinum records plus an Emmy nomination.  The author of “How To Write A Hit Song, Fifth Edition” and “How To Be A Hit Songwriter”, and the producer of “Molly-Ann Leikin’s Master Class in Songwriting”, Molly consults with talented writers and artists all over the world, with a view to helping them market their material.  She also matches lyricists with composers.  And she’s very good at it.  Three of her clients have Grammy nominations, another won an Emmy, and so far, 5067 others, with Molly’s help, have placed their work in movies, on TV, CD’s and in commercials.

Her website is www.songmd.com.  You can reach her at [email protected]  If you live in the USA or Canada, you can call her toll-free at 800-851-6588.  For more information on the USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, hit song, hit songwriter, Lyrics, Molly-Ann Leikin, emmy, platinum records, how to write a better song, hit song writer

USA Songwriting Competition's Showcase During SXSW

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Mar 24, 2010 @07:15 PM

 

Anne Simoni, 14th Annual USA Songwriting Competition 1st Prize winner performed at SXSW showcase at Borders on March 19, 2010.

 

 

 

Wendy Colonna, 5th Annual IAMA (International Acoustic Music Awards) 1st Prize winner performed at SXSW showcase at Borders on March 19, 2010.

 

 

Tags: songwriter, USA Songwriting Competition, swsx

Keeping Things Cheap As A Musician

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Fri, Mar 05, 2010 @04:03 PM

by Brandon, Sonicbids Member Relations Representative

I’m a pretty cheap guy. This doesn’t seem to help much in the dating scene, but can quite useful as a musician, instruments cost hundreds of dollars a piece and unless you’ve reached a certain level of success, it’s difficult to pay that back quickly, if at all. So, when starting out you’ll want to minimize your costs as much as possible while gradually increasing your presence both locally and (inter)nationally. I’ve found quite a few ways to do so, and thought I’d share them. Obviously the possibilities are endless, so feel free to comment here and share your ideas as well.

 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FRIENDS AND STUDENTS

Hiring big names for collaborations is great for quick exposure, but if you’re short on cash, there are alternatives. Friends, local contacts and students are great ones for several reasons:

 

1) They (in most cases) know you already, so you can form a personal relationship in addition to a professional one.

2) They may even be more motivated to help out (students in particular – see below).

3) They are less expensive to hire.

 

If you have a brother who’s a marketing genius, for instance, perhaps try to get him on board to help you with marketing your project and creating your brand.

 

I also mentioned this in my last post, but colleges are a cesspool of many things, including budding young talent. Aspiring art students are looking for their big break in graphic design, photography or illustration — hire a student who understands your branding goals to do your artwork for you. Since they’re just starting out, they won’t be as expensive to hire as a renowned artist, and may do equally great work.

 

EMBRACE TECHNOLOGY WITH YOUR WEB PRESENCE

A couple of ideas here:

 

1) Email your Electronic Press Kit. It’s free to do with your Myspace or Sonicbids account, and you can track when the recipient actually opens the electronic press kit unlike in a normal email. This is a good way to save cash while getting that closure you need.

 

2) Build a cheap website. While sites like Sonicbids, MySpace, Facebook, etc. allow you to promote your band and its identity, you’ll want a home site on the internet, which helps secure that identity at an easy-to-find location (yourbandname.com, for instance). Building a website seems daunting at first, but there are tons of cheap/free services out there to help make this relatively painless, both on your brain and your wallet. I’ve personally found Wordpress, known for its blogging capabilities, to be an immensely powerful site-building tool as well, and it’s totally free to use. Check out a great example of a Wordpress-powered site for Sonicbids band Stereogrove here.

 

BE SMART ABOUT PROMOTIONS AND TOURING

When The Seedy Seeds came by the Sonicbids office recently, I had a good conversation with Brian, one of the masterminds behind the band, who mentioned their small, incremental touring method, rather than going all-out on a massive national tour. This is a smart way to approach touring: there’s no sense in blowing all your cash on a great tour and then not being able to afford another one after that, losing that expanded fanbase you just got in a matter of weeks. Try a shorter approach to touring, by doing short, frequent trips to very specific targeted regions. Also take some time to study the music scenes of those regions: there’s no sense in playing metal in a city where indie rock is all the rage.

 

Again, there’s a ton of possibilities here. This is just a start, so please comment away, or feel free to reach me and the Sonicbids Member Relations Team.

Tags: sonicbids, Myspace, cheap musician, indie musician, music promotion, twitter, facebook, purevolume, soundclick

How To Be Professional As A Songwriter In The Music Business

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Feb 10, 2010 @10:40 AM

Molly-Ann Leikin

How To Be Professional As A Songwriter In The Music Business

By Molly-Ann Leikin, Songwriting Consultant

    

The music business is a business.  The people we need to connect with on a professional level may look street and talk street, but when money is at stake – especially big money, which is often the case in our industry – we serve ourselves best by acting and doing business like the pro’s. 

    That means conducting ourselves as we would in any other business - whether it’s selling seashells,  stocks or sour cream cinnamon raisin coffee cake, nuts optional.   It’s not about what we want.  It’s what the guy on the other side of desk needs, and, assuming we have it, trying to determine how best to present it.   

    Say you’re a pretzel baker and I’m the World Distributer.  I would expect you to approach me the way my already established clients do.  Remember, as the Pretzel Honcho, I have thousands of people coming at me every day with pitches.  Therefore, to get my attention, what you’re selling has to sound as good or read as well as, if not better, than everyone else’s.  Notice I didn’t say your product, I said your pitch, because, since I’m Pretzel Queen, if you don’t catch my ear or eye, you’re out.    

    Only if your pitch is interesting, will I be willing to try your pretzel.  I didn’t make that up.  That’s how business is conducted, no matter what the product.

    The initial part of your pitch is the presentation. 

    Fancy jewel cases containing photos of your dying iguana lying on a copy of your past-due rent slip, or dancing adorable treble clefs breaking out as rashes all over your letterhead, don’t cut it.  Use a simple jewel case, include a short letter stating your goal, plus a professional, accurate business card identifying you as your music self.  Leave out the jicama franchise and your muffler academy.  We’re only talking music here, okay?

    Further, if you want to be taken seriously, don’t send anyone an unidentified CD or a lyric scribbled on a used paper towel.  Nor should you send a CD in a collapsed tangerine box stuffed with toilet paper, no lyric, and no contact information.  Please - put your name, address, email address, and phone number on each item, making sure your spelling is correct and the information is easy to read.        

    Remember, perception is everything.  

    You deserve to be successful.  And I’m confident you’ll see that by taking the time to make a thoroughly professional presentation, you’ll already be halfway there.   

© 2010 Molly-Ann Leikin
www.songmd.com

Molly-Ann Leikin (rhymes with bacon) is a songwriting consultant in Los Angeles. She has dozens of gold and platinum records, plus an Emmy nomination.  So far, Molly has written themes and songs for over five dozen movies and TV shows, including “Violet”, that won an Oscar. The author of “How To Write A Hit Song, Fifth Edition”, “How To Be A Hit Songwriter”, and the producer of “Molly-Ann Leikin’s Master Class in Songwriting”, Molly consults with talented writers and artists all over the world, with a view to helping them market their material.  She also matches lyricists with composers.  Six of her clients are Grammy winners, eleven more are Grammy nominees, and so far, with Molly’s help, almost 7000 other writers/artists have placed their work in movies, on TV, CD’s, in commercials, and their tracks are downloaded all over the web. Her website is www.songmd.com. You can reach her at [email protected].  

For more information on the USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net


 

Tags: Molly-Ann Leikin, music business, professional music, emmy, platinum records

Radio Stations That Will Play Your Songs

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Jan 28, 2010 @12:38 PM

We have received e-mails from many songwriters and unsigned artists that have asked us where can they get heard. Here are a list of radio stations that will play your material:

 

WAAW Shout 94.7 FM
PO Box 940, Aiken, SC 29802
PH: 803-649-6405 FX: 803-641-8844
Harry Hughes [email protected]
www.waaw947.fm
Serving to the edification of the Body of Christ and community building by providing sound ministry, Gospel music and in formation to masses through daily talk programs and business and community partnerships. Audio materials must be submitted in one of the following formats: WAV, MP3 or WMA. (for proprietary formats – please consult with WAAW). Audio materials may be submitted on the following media: CD, data DVD, flash drives and other various memory cards. We recommend that you send files through "Yousendit."

 

New Driven Radio - WBCX
PH: 770-538-4744
Sherry Sabine [email protected]
www.facebook.com/NewDrivenRadio
A weekly 4 hour radio show that features only independent Rock from across the US and around the world. It airs Tuesdays 8-midnight (est). We feature independent bands from Soft Rock, Hard Rock, Punk, Metal, Southern Rock, Americana, Pop and everything in between. The first 2 hours are called New Driven Cruise and we feature the softer stuff there. The second two hours is called New Driven Torqued and the harder stuff is featured there.


KTRL Radio
attn: Drew Slattery (Music Director), 90.5 KTRL, Box T-0095, Tarleton State U. Stephenville TX 76402
www.tarleton.edu/ktrl
A new station looking for all styles of Folk, Roots/Americana, Country and World Music.

KURT Radio
attn: Drew Slattery (Music Director), 100.7 KURT, Box T-0095, Tarleton State U. Stephenville TX 76402
www.tarleton.edu/ktrl
Send us your Rock music.

KYHY
PO Box 3422, Burbank, CA 91508
Jerry [email protected]
www.925kyhy.com
We have rocked Burbank, Los Angeles County and the World since May 1, 2008 and we continue to do so for one reason – independent music.


High Plains Morning - HPPR
101 W. 5th St. #100, Amarillo, TX 79101
PH: 806-367-9088
Johnny Black [email protected]
www.hppr.org
Singer/Songwriters, Bluegrass, Contemporary Folk, World, Jazz and much more. Includes a performance studio.

Samm Brown's "For The Record", a weekly radio program on KPFK 90.7 FM, is seeking artists/bands for airplay and critique. Each Sunday, Brown hosts a program that focuses on the entertainment industry in general and the music business in particular. Send a package to Samm Brown's For The Record, KPFK Radio, 90.7 FM, 11054 Ventura Blvd. No. 237, Studio City, CA. 91604.

Radio Rietveld
Frederik Roeskestraat 96, 1076 ED Amsterdam, The Netherlands
PH: 003120-5711600 FX: 003120-5711654
Hans Kuiper/ Gijs Muller [email protected]
www.radiorietveld.nl
We feature independent music, originally produced programs, soundscapes, radio plays, interviews and art specials. We are connected to the Gerrit Rietveld Art Academy in Amsterdam.

WBMB Baruch College Radio, 87.9 FM The Biz
55 Lexington Ave. Ste. 3-280, New York, NY 10010
PH: 646-312-4720
Gina Alioto [email protected]
www.wbmbradio.com
Featuring all styles of music.

WNCW - Isothermal College
PO Box 804, Spindale, NC 28160
PH: 828-287-8000 x349 FX: 828-287-8012
Martin Anderson [email protected]
www.wncw.org
We're always looking for new Americana, Rock, Singer/Songwriter and World music to play.

WOJB - Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa College
13386 W. Trepania Rd. Hayward, WI 54843
PH: 715-634-2100 FX: 715-634-4070
Nicky Kellar [email protected]
www.wojb.org
We're one of the most diverse and popular stations in Wisconsin.

KRCK-FM 97.7
73-733 Fred Waring Dr. #201, Palm Desert, CA 92260
PH: 760-341-0123 FX: 760-341-7455
The Big KC [email protected]
http://www.krck.com
KRCK supports local talent and encourages independent artists. Rock & Alternative format.


*The list of radio stations have been complied from our staff here at USA Songwriting Competition as well as Indie Bible directory.

For more information on the USA Songwriting Competition, please go tp: http://www.songwriting.net 


Tags: radio stations, indie bands, indie songwriter, independent musicians

Top 10 USA Songwriting Winners Of The Decade

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Jan 25, 2010 @07:52 PM

These are the top 10 USA Songwriting Competition winners of the decade:

1. Kate Voegele (2005 USA Songwriting Competition, 1st Prize Winner, Pop) appeared on "The Tonight Show" with Conan O'Brien performing her hit song "99 Times", a Billboard Adult Top 40 Hit, peaking at #24. She hit Top 10 On Billboard 200 Albums Chart on June 15, 20. Her album "A Fine Mess" was released on Interscope/MySpace records. Her winning song"Only Fooling Yourself" hit the Billboard charts at #37.

2. Ari Gold. Winner of the 12th Annual USA Songwriting Competition (2007). After his win in the USA Songwriting Competition, Ari's winning song went on to hit #10 on the Billboard Charts, #1 on Sirius OutQ, #1 on Logo TV, etc.

3. Cathy Fink & Marcy Marxer. They won the first prize in the Children's music category of the 2005 competition for their song "Scat Like That". The album of the same name won a Grammy award in the "Best Musical Album For Children" category.

4. (3 way tie) Kyler England, Gabriel Mann and Adrianne Gonzalez. Kyler England (2009 USA Songwriting Competition 1st Prize Winner), Gabriel Mann (2003 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize Winner) & Adrianne Gonzalez (1999 Overall Grand Prize Winner) formed a Pop group "The Rescues", were just signed to Universal Republic Records in 2009.

7. Sarah Lonsert. Only 17 years old, not only broke the first prize record of being the youngest winner but also the overall grand prize winner of being the youngest winner ever. The previous youngest first prize winner was Kate Voegele, who won in 2005 at 18 years old. Adrianne Gonzalez was the youngest overall grand prize winner at 22 years old when she won in 1999. Sarah also won first prize in the Dance/Electronica category, making her the first from that category to ever win the overall grand prize. Sarah Lonsert will be releasing a full length CD earlier next year. Although Sarah suffers from autism (first autistic winner ever), she is a budding singer-songwriter and has also won the L.A. Music Awards a month before her win.

8. Darrell Scott. His song "Good Ol USA" (first prize winner of the country category in 2005) was released by Faith Hill's album in 2006.

9. Vikki Simpson. Vikki became the first non-USA based musician to ever will the overall grand prize at the USA Songwriting Competition. She achieved that in 2006. She is part of the award winning group "The Waifs".

10. Steve Tannen. Steve won the overall grand prize in 2001. He went on to get signed by Nettwerk records with his duo "The Weepies" .


Tags: Kate Voegele, Sarah Lonsert, Ari Gold, song contest, USA Songwriting Competition, Billboard Charts, Music Performance, winners, Billboard Album Charts, Songwriters, Hits, Grammy Award

Wyclef Jean Urges You To Help Haiti

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Jan 14, 2010 @05:25 PM

Haiti faced a natural disaster of unprecedented proportion, an earthquake unlike anything the country has ever experienced. The magnitude 7.0 earthquake - and several very strong aftershocks - struck only 10 miles from Port-au-Prince. Wyclef Jean, member of the hit group "The Fugees" has created a charity fund:
http://www.yele.org

Winning song of the USA Songwriting Competition on TV Tomorrow

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Dec 15, 2009 @05:17 PM

Ari Gold

The 2007 Overall Grand Prize winning song of the USA Songwriting Competition "Where The Music Takes You" written & performed by Ari Gold will be on ABC TV's "Scrubs" on 12/16/09. The winning song hit Top 10 on the Billboard Charts 6 months after winning the competition.

Tags: Ari Gold, USA Songwriting Competition, Billboard Charts, songwriting success, Scrubs

TEEN PHENOM WINS USA SONGWRITING COMPETITION, NEW COMPETITION BEGINS

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Dec 09, 2009 @02:18 PM

Sarah Lonsert

Teen phenom Sarah Lonsert won the Overall Grand Prize of the 14th Annual USA Songwriting Competition along with co-writer Jonathan George. Her winning song "Dancing Through Life" will be on the USA Songwriting Competition's compilation CD next year. Sarah Lonsert, only 17 years old, not only broke the first prize record of being the youngest winner but also the overall grand prize winner of being the youngest winner ever. The previous youngest first prize winner was Kate Voegele, who won in 2005 at 18 years old. Adrianne Gonzalez was the youngest overall grand prize winner at 22 years old when she won in 1999. Sarah also won first prize in the Dance/Electronica category, making her the first from that category to ever win the overall grand prize. Sarah Lonsert will be releasing a full length CD earlier next year. Although Sarah suffers from autism, she is a budding singer-songwriter and has also won the L.A. Music Awards last month.

Eric Colville (from Ipswich, MA) won the overall second prize and Anne Simoni (from Brazil) won the overall third prize.

This year also marks the first time that USA Songwriting Competition had two winners from Spain. Ariel Queupumil from Guadalajara, Spain won the first prize in the Latin Category while Eduardo de la Iglesia Nieto from Madrid, Spain won the First Prize in the instrumental category.

Celeste Scalone, an American Idol semi-finalist and "Making The Band" reality tv show finalist won 1st prize in the R&B category. 

Nicole Morier and Fabien Waltman from Los Angeles won the first prize in the Pop category. Nicole has written songs for Britney Spears and is also an artist. Helle Hansen (from Denmark) tied with Ariel Queupumil for having the most songs in the finals, at 5 songs each. Here is the list of winners:

OVERALL GRAND PRIZE WINNER:
Sarah Lonsert
Dancing Through Life - Sarah Lonsert & Jonathan George; Mission Viejo, CA


OVERALL 2nd PRIZE:
End of War - Eric Colville; Ipswich, MA


OVERALL 3rd PRIZE:
Papagaio - Anne Simoni; BRAZIL

 


FIRST PRIZES IN EACH CATEGORY:
1st Prize - LATIN
Fruto Prohibido - Ariel Queupumil; Guadalajara, SPAIN

1st Prize - LYRICS
End of War - Eric Colville; Ipswich, MA

1st Prize - R&B
Red Light - Celeste Scalone & Enpho; Sherman Oaks, CA

1st Prize - DANCE/ELECTRONICA
Dancing Through Life - Sarah Lonsert and Jonathan George; Mission Viejo, CA

1st Prize - FOLK
Bullets To Bite - Melissa Greener; Austin, TX

1st Prize - COUNTRY
You and I - Kyler England; Los Angeles, CA

1st Prize - ROCK/ALTERNATIVE
I'm Not - Carla Cappa; Blue Bell, PA

1st Prize - POP
Good Boy - Nicole Morier & Fabien Waltman; Los Angeles, CA

1st Prize - HIP-HOP/RAP
Strange Kinda Love - Ashley J. Llorens, Monique Harcum, Steven Boel & SoulStice; Columbia, MD

1st Prize - WORLD
Papagaio - Anne Simoni; BRAZIL

1st Prize - INSTRUMENTAL
The Pursuit - Eduardo de la Iglesia Nieto; Madrid, SPAIN

1st Prize - JAZZ
Your Eyes - Vanessa Moodley; Durban, SOUTH AFRICA

1st Prize - GOSPEL/INSPIRATIONAL
Every Time - Tom Poulter; NSW, AUSTRALIA

1st Prize - NOVELTY/COMEDY
The Starbucks of County Down - Greg Trafidlo, Neal Phillips & John Seay; Salem, VA

1st Prize - CHILDREN
Tallest Tree - Jeremy and Rebecca; Visalia, CA

 

Honorable Mention Awards
1. Vamo Ya - Peter Torsiello & Liliana de Leon; Mesa, AZ
2. Beautiful Life - Claire Ulanoff, Will Hopkins; Nashville, TN
3. Anyway U Want - Nichole C. Minor aka Alias; Washington D.C.
4. This is My Life - Andrea Benham; Bloomfield, NJ
5. The Peddler - Maria Dunn; Edmonton, CANADA
6. Hurricane - (Mandee Radford) Alathea; Unicoi, TN
7. The Runner - Jesse Terry/Fred Wilhelm; Nashville, TN
8. Bait Shack - (Whitelaw, Lewis & Lewis ) Jimi Whitelaw; Gallatin, TN
9. Hard To Smile - ORBO & The Longshots; Os, NORWAY
10. Waiting - Jonathan Ferreri & Chris Upton; Nashvile, TN
11. Guitar - Carsten Lindberg, Joachim Svare, J. Belle & Jayden; Loa Angeles, CA
12. Eye for an Eye - Rebecca Wolfers & Dirtywings; Queensland, AUSTRALIA
13. Vai-e-Vem - Luiz Simas; New York, NY
14. Reason For Me To Smile - Helle Hansen & Ole Kibsgaard; Copenhagen, DENMARK
15. Where There Are Dreams - Jen Waters & Bob Farrell; Toluca Lake, CA
16. What I Do With Your Time - (Anadara Arnold and Stephanie Lewis) Anadara; Nashville, TN
17. I've Done It - Brent Lillie & Paul Harris; Queensland, AUSTRALIA
18. Jubilation - Cathy Fink & Marcy Marxer; Kensington, MD
19. Woman In The Dark - Dewi Puspita; Bali, INDONESIA
20. Hypnotized - Beezy; Commerce City, CO


Entries are currently being accepted for the 15th Annual USA Songwriting Competition. Winning songs of the 15th Annual USA Songwriting Competition will receive airplay on a nationally syndicated radio program "Acoustic Café" as well as Sirius XM Satellite Radio. This is the first Songwriting Competition that gives airplay to the winning songs, giving deserving bands, songwriters the recognition and exposure they deserve. Entrants stand to win a grand prize of over US$50,000 in cash and music gear from sponsors such as Sony, D'Addario Strings, Ibanez Guitars, Audio-Technica, IK Multimedia, and more, making this the largest prize package for any annual songwriting competition. For more information on the 15th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit:
http://www.songwriting.net

 


Tags: Songwriting, Sarah Lonsert, Nicole Morier, American Idol, USA Songwriting Competition, winners, Britney Spears, Songwriters