Songwriting Tips, News & More

Songwriting: Top songs by Hal David and Burt Bacharach

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Sep 04, 2012 @10:26 AM

Top songs by Hal David and Burt Bacharach

 

 Hal David, songwriter, lyricist

 Hal wrote first song for bandleader Sammy Kaye and then teamed up with Burt Bacharach to write the biggest hits in Pop history. He has won a Grammy award as well as a Academy Award. He also wrote the lyrics for the following film scores: "Wives and Lovers," "Casino Royale," "April Fools," "Lost Horizon," "After the Fox," "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance," "Oklahoma Crude," "What's New Pussycat?" "Two Gals and a Guy," "Promise Her Anything," "Alfie," "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," and "Moonraker". 

The notable songs of Hal David and Burt Bacharach. David died Saturday at age 91:

— "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head"; #1 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"This Guy's in Love with You" ; #1 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts "I'll Never Fall in Love Again"; #1 on UK Charts

—"Do You Know the Way to San Jose"; #10 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"Don't Make Me Over"; #21 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"(They Long to Be) Close to You" ; #1 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"Walk On By"; #6 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"What the World Needs Now Is Love"; #7 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"I Say a Little Prayer"; #4 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"The Story of My Life"; #15 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"Magic Moments"; #4 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me"; #1 on UK Charts

—"One Less Bell to Answer"; #2 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"Anyone Who Had a Heart"; #8 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"What's New Pussycat?"; #3 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"Alfie"; #15 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

—"The Look of Love"; #22 on Billboard Hot 100 Charts

 

His awards include:
1969 - Academy Award (Oscar)\Music (Song Original For the Picture-Butch Cassidy and the Sundace Kid)\Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head
1969 - NARAS\Grammy\Best Original Score From an Original Cast Show Album\Promises, Promises
1969 - NARM\President's Award for Sustained Creative Achievement (with Burt Bacharach)
1969 - B'nai B'rith\Creative Achievement Award (with Burt Bacharach)
1972 - National Academy of Popular Music\Songwriters' Hall of Fame induction
1991 - Lincoln College\Doctor of Music Degree
1996 - National Academy of Popular Music\Johnny Mercer Award (with Burt Bacharach)
1997 - NARAS\Grammy Trustees Award\Burt Bacharach & Hal David
1997 - National Academy of Popular Music Songwriter's Hall of Fame induction
1997 - ASCAP\Founders Award

Hal David Quotes: "Now, how do I go about the business of writing lyrics? I wish I really knew. If I did it would make writing much easier for me. Because I have no formula, sometimes it flows smoothly and other times it is like rowing a boat upstream. Most often a lyric starts with a title. A line in a book I am reading may set me off. Other times some dialogue in a play or a movie becomes the catalyst. More often than not the idea just pops into my head-where it comes from I hardly ever know....In writing I search for believability, simplicity, and emotional impact..." 

"The form of songwriting is very restrictive because it's in a very small frame. But because of its restrictions you get a bonus you couldn't get in any other art form. Because it is in this little microcosm, if it works it should have a greater explosion, a greater impact. And I think that's why songs have a greater effect on the public than almost any other form of creative work."

"I'm a laborer. I never accept my first idea. I always look for a new approach. The most difficult part of the whole process for me is letting go; of saying 'that's the best I can do,' and go on to the next song."

For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: Songwriting, Burt Bacharach, Hal David

2011 USA Songwriting Competition Radio Podcast

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Sat, May 21, 2011 @12:53 PM


MusicPlaylist
Music Playlist at MixPod.com

 

Alannah Myles, songwriter

Tune in to the 2011 USA Songwriting Competition Podcast, this features never before heard demo versions of the winners of the USA Songwriting Competition (past & present). Click on the audio player above to listen to the music. 

Music featured in this podcast by:

Kate Voegele – Only Fooling Myself

This version is the demo version before it was re-produced and re-mixed when she was signed to Interscope Records. This song went on to hit Top 40 on the Billboard Charts. 


Ari Gold – Where The Music Takes You Writers: Ari Gold, Joe Hogue 'JOJOHO' & Sean Petersen

This song is a demo version before it was remixed and reproduced and before it hit Top 10 on the Billboard charts. 


Alannah Myles – Give Me Love (see pictured above) Writers: Alannah Myles & Nancy Simmonds

Rosie Casey & Hillary Podell – Is That So Bad
Writers: Ken Hirsch, Rosie Casey, Peter Roberts & Hillary Podell

Amelia Curran – The Mistress

ASON - Be Inspired

Ian Holmes – More
Writers: Raleigh Hall & Gordon Chambers

Pepper MaShay – Does Yo Mamma Know

Christopher Tin – Baba Yetu

This song went on to win 2 Grammy awards in 2011, making Christopher the only USA Songwriting Competition winner to ever win 2 or more Grammy awards in one evening. 

 

USA Songwriting Competition promotes the art & excellence in songwriting. For more information on the 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: Berklee, Ken Hirsch, Kate Voegele, Ari Gold, Billboard Charts, Alannah Myles, Pepper Mashay, Grammy Awards, Hal David, Christopher Tin, Raleigh Hall, Amelia Curran, ASON, Gordon Chambers

Hit Songwriter Ken Hirsch Talks About Songwriting

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Apr 04, 2011 @01:51 PM

Hit Songwriter Ken Hirsch Talks About Songwriting, interviewed by Kiran Michaels

Ken Hirsch, Hit Songwriter


Ken Hirsch won First Prize in the Pop category of the 15th Annual USA Songwriting Competition as well as the Overall Second Prize with the song he wrote "Is That So Bad", co-written with Rosie Casey, Peter Roberts and Hillary Podell. He has also written the numerous hit songs such as “I've Never Been To Me” by Charlene and top 40 hit song “Two Less Lonely People In The World” by Air Supply. His songs have been recorded by legends in the music business. He talks to Kiran Michaels about how he writes songs and how he gets inspiration for it.  

1. You have written with the top names in the business today such as Hal David ("Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head", "This Guy's in Love with You"), Gerry Goffin ("Will You Love Me Tomorrow"), Paul Williams ("Evergreen"), Howard Greenfield ("Breaking Up Is Hard to Do"), Ron Miller ("I've Never Been To Me" & "Touch Me in the Morning') and have written songs that have been recorded by the the biggest names: Barbara Streisand, Celine Dion, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Air Supply, etc. Can you describe how you write a song? 

In my case, with most of the above co-writers, I created a complete melody first (which is always subject to change and molding)and then played it for them either live or on tape.  Most of these co-writers like to be inspired by a melody and rarely just write a freestanding lyric.  With Howie Greenfield, "Two Less Lonely People In The World" started as a title he had come up with from his personal book of titles and lyric fragments.  However, there have been just as many co-writes that happen simultaneously in the room which brings a whole other type of energy to the process.  On rare occasions I am given a partial/completed lyric or a lyric idea.  All three procedures are viable as long as the results work.  Every other blue moon I write both music and lyrics and thus avoid any creative conflicts and sharing of royalties!



2. Hal David, Gerry Goffin  and Howard Greenfield sounded like the people from the Brill Building. Did you ever write songs at the famed Brill building? 


No, when I was hitting the streets in 1970, it was kind of the end of the Brill building era  but a publisher I played my songs for in the building connected me with Doc Pomus ("Save The Last Dance For Me", "This Magic Moment"), one of the most famous of the Brill Building writers, who became my partner and mentor.  



3. How do you get ideas for creating a melody?

Other than seeing what bills need to be paid, usually an interesting set of intervals or chord progression can get the juices flowing.  

 

4. Who is your favorite songwriter, music wise? What did you learn from him/her?

In Pop it would have to be Burt Bacharach and Carol King.  Burt's sophistication combined with his innate soulfulness and Carol's ability to write hooks with a soulful energy are masterful.  They write melodies that are both accessible and unpredictable.  Then there's everyone else from Irving Berlin to Richard Rogers to Jule Styne to McCartney/Lennon to James Taylor to Ashford & Simpson, etc.



5. Who is your favorite songwriter, lyric wise?

I've been fortunate to write with some of the best so they all fall into that category.  I personally like lyrics that aren't too obscure, can be easily grasped or tell a great story.  Everyone from Sammy Cahn to Marty Panzer to so many of the country writers who really are wordsmiths of the first order.



6. How did you write your winning song? Did the melody come first or the lyrics or background music?

Our song "Is That So Bad" (co-written with Rosie Casey, Peter Roberts and Hillary Podell) actually started with a track that Peter was working on.  I added most of the melody and Rosie and Hillary, an artist we were working with, created the lyric.  It was loosely based on Hillary's own experience and then fleshed out by Rosie.  A fortunate confluence of events!  The final demo was produced by Smidi Smith and sung by Windy Wagner, so it's had quite a journey - so far! 



7. The top 3 winners this past year were all collaborations. Is collaboration in Songwriting important these days? 

It is and it isn't.  It depends on your strengths and ability to work with others.  But collaborations generally bring a lot of energy and ideas to the table that you necessarily wouldn't have come up with yourself.



8. Can you describe the collaboration with other writers and producers?

If everyone is pulling in the same direction it can be inspiring.  It helps if everyone can put their egos aside and concentrate on the work.  It's always a gamble, certain collaborators pull things out of you that you did not foresee.  It sometimes puts you into a different zone than what you're comfortable with but that can have positive results.  I've been writing a musical "An Officer and a Gentleman" with Robin Lerner ("This Kiss") and although we've never collaborated before we're both bringing different sensibilities to the project and it seems to be melding really well.  So the crapshoot this time is paying off!



9. What advice would you give to up-and-coming songwriters out there? 

It's all been said a million times but try to go with your gut and try not to compromise too much.  Having said that, try to be as objective as you can.  Don't fall in love with everything you write, many of the times it can be improved.  Don't be reluctant to give up on an idea if it's not working.  I try to separate myself from the writing and put myself in the place of the audience and imagine if I would enjoy listening to this song or if it moves me.  And it helps to have a very thick skin, never take the rejections personally - as hard as they may be to accept, there might be a fairy tale ending just around the corner.  And always keep the tape recorder running!

Ken will be performing his winning song along with a medley of his hit songs “I've Never Been To Me”, “Two Less Only People In The World”, etc at USA Songwriting Competition's showcase at Bluebird Cafe on May 5th

Tags: song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, Ken Hirsch, hit songwriter, Billboard Top 40 Hit, Grammy, Gerry Goffin, Hal David, Carol King, Paul Williams, Howard Greenfield, Ron Miller, Brill Building

Top 10 Songwriting Teams

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, May 26, 2010 @06:41 PM

These are the top songwriting teams/collaborations. When you put two or more heads together, you may come up with a hit or two.

1. Paul McCartney & John Lennon
With pop anthems such like "Yesterday" and Let It Be". Lennon & McCartney is argubly the best songwriting collaboraion in the world. With a resume of the best selling band in the world and the most successful songwriter of all-time (McCartney). This dynamic duo tops the list. 

 

2. Rodgers and Hammerstein
Richard Rodgers (1902 - 1979) and Oscar Hammerstein II (1895 - 1960) were a well-known American songwriting duo, usually referred to as Rodgers and Hammerstein. With musicals such as "The Sound of Music" and "South Pacific", their songs have made into the mainstream Pop and became household names.


 Burt Bacharach and Hal David
3. Burt Bacharach and Hal David
With hits such as: "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head", "This Guy's in Love with You", "I'll Never Fall in Love Again", "Do You Know the Way to San Jose", "Walk On By", "What the World Needs Now Is Love", "I Say a Little Prayer", "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me", "One Less Bell to Answer", and "Anyone Who Had a Heart".

4. Elton John & Bernie Taupin
Elton has made magic with lyricist Taupin and wrote hits such as "Your Song" and Candle In the Wind". In fact the only time he didn't use Bernie was his "Victim of Love" album which resulted with no hits.

 

5. Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller
With hits such as "Hound Dog", "Stand By Me" and Jailhouse Rock". They have written the soundtrack of the 50's and beyond.

 

6. Holland, Dozier, Holland
Holland-Dozier-Holland is a songwriting and production team made up of Lamont Dozier and brothers Brian Holland and Edward Holland, Jr. They are one of the greatest songwriting teams in pop music. The trio wrote and arranged many of the songs making up the Motown sound that dominated American popular music in the 1960s with hits such as "Heat Wave", "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)", "You Can't Hurry Love" and more.

 

 

7. Carole King & Gerry Goffin
With iconic hits such as "Will You Love Me Tomorrow", "Up on the Roof" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman".

 

 

8. Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil
With pop anthems such as You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'", "Never Gonna Let You Go", "Make Your Own Kind of Music". This husband and wife team went on to create songs for numerous contemporary artists, winning a number of Grammy Awards and Academy Award nominations for their compositions for film.

 

9. Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman
Also known collectively as "Stock Aitken Waterman", this UK team has written #1 80's iconic hits such as: "Never Gonna Give You Up" by Rick Astley, "Respectable" by Mel and Kim, and more.

 

10. Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis
They have written hits for Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson, Mariah Carey, Mary J Blige, etc.
 

 

This article is brought to you by USA Songwriting Competition. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

 

 

 


Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Burt Bacharach, Paul McCartney, Top 10 Songwriting Team, Top 10 Songwriting Collaborations, John Lennon, Hal David, Rodgers, Hammerstein