Songwriting Tips, News & More

2014 Songwriters Showcase @ Bluebird Cafe

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Fri, May 16, 2014 @07:54 AM

USA Songwriting Competition presented a Songwriters Showcase on May 8, 2014 at the famous Bluebird Cafe in Nashville, TN. It was a sold-out packed show. Liz Miller hosted the showcase with the following songwriters, see pictures and videos below:

Johnny Bulford (First Prize Winner, 18th Annual USA Songwriting Competition)
Daisy Mallory (Finalist)
Lauren Lucas (Honorable Mention Winner)
Natalie Howard (Finalist)
Kayliann Lowe (Finalist)

Songwriters Showcase at Bluebird Cafe

From bottom left to right are Daisy Mallory,Lauren Lucas,Johnny Bulford, Natalie Howard.
From back left to right are Kayliann Lowe & Liz Miller

 

 

 Johnny Bulford, singing his #1 hit song "A Woman Like You" (recorded by Lee Brice)

 

 

 Lauren Lucas, performing "Just Haven't Found Him Yet":

 

 

 Natalie Howard, performing "Hit The Hay":

 

For more information on the 19th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Songwriters Showcase, Bluebird Cafe, USA Songwriting Competition, Johnny Bulford, Daisy Mallory, Kayliann Lowe, Lauren Lucas, Natalie Howard

Songwriting for Film & TV

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 @09:45 AM

SONGWRITING FOR FILM & TV

By Robin Frederick

 SongwritingFilmTV

Thousands of songs are used in TV shows, films, and commercials each year. You've heard them in shows like Grey's Anatomy, The Vampire Diaries, House, Gossip Girl, 90210, Hart of Dixie, Nashville, and more. You've heard them in commercials for Subaru, Lowe's, AT&T, Volkswagen, and Traveler's Insurance.

When listeners hear something they like, they often head straight to the product or TV show website to find out the name of the artist or song title. Sales at iTunes can be anywhere from 20,000 (Jason Walker's "Down" featured in The Vampire Diaries to 100,000 (Ingrid Michaelson's "Keep Breathing" featured in a season-closing episode of Grey's Anatomy).

When you add in performance royalties and fees for the song's use, film & TV can provide a solid income stream that pays off over time, especially if you have numerous placements.

 

SO WHAT DOES YOUR SONG NEED TO DO?

For every song that's placed, many are auditioned - often hundreds - but only one is chosen. The song that will get the job is the one that enhances the emotion or adds impact for viewers.

Is a character discovering real love for the first time? The song needs to evoke that feeling for the audience. Is the film set in a small town in the 1950s? The song must accurately recall the era and provide the emotional mood needed. Always remember: the song serves the needs of the project.

With that in mind, it may seem a little strange that a majority of the songs that are placed in film and TV are written and recorded first, before they’re ever pitched to these projects. Often, the songs are part of an artist's CD. While they're being written, there's no way to know how these songs might eventually be used in a film or TV show.

So, if you don't know how your song will be used, how can you craft it to increase your chances of a placement?

 

WRITE UNIVERSAL LYRICS

Music users in the film and TV market often say they're looking for songs with "universal lyrics." But just what does that mean?

A universal lyric is...

A lyric that a large number of people can identify with or relate to.

A lyric that will not conflict with the specific content of a scene.

A good lyric for film and TV is universal enough to allow the song to be used in a variety of scenes while maintaining emotional integrity, originality, and focus.


Hint: Choose a common theme

Of course, no song will work for every scene but some themes and situations occur more frequently than others - falling in love, breaking up, or overcoming adversity, for example. If you choose one of these, you're more likely to be successful. Watch a few TV episodes and look for common themes. Chances are you're already using some of them in your songs.

Find out how to bring your lyric theme to life.

 

Another Hint: Don’t do the scriptwriter’s job

Too many specific physical details, like place names, proper names, and specific story details, will limit the uses of your song. For example, let’s say your song is called "Sara Smile." That was a great title for a Hall & Oates hit but… it could be confusing to viewers if there's no character named Sara in the scene. For film & TV uses, try a title like “In Your Smile” or “I Need Your Smile.” Let the scriptwriter name the characters.

 

MUSIC: THINK LIKE A FILM COMPOSER

Filmmakers have always used instrumental music to communicate mood, energy, and atmosphere to the audience, from soaring love themes to the high anxiety of a fast-paced action cue.

As songs have grown in popularity with viewers, they're being used to replace some of that instrumental music. A song that works well for film and TV is one that, like an instrumental cue, uses melody, chords, pace (tempo), and rhythm to evoke a single mood or energy level.

If you've written an uptempo song about a wild party or a slow song about lost love, you're already using tempo and rhythm to express energy or mood. Songwriters often do this instinctively, but you can hone that ability for the film and TV market, making your music even more expressive and useable. Like a film composer, you can choose a tempo and groove that physically express the energy level you want, then back it up with chords melody, and lyrics.

Listen to the instrumental cues that accompany various types of scenes: action, danger, romantic meeting or breakup, characters having fun, arguing, or being thoughtful. Notice how the music adds to the effectiveness of scene. Try writing a song that makes use of a few of those elements, something that might work instead of underscore. This is a great way to get into the film & TV songwriting mood!

Above all, listen to songs that are being used in the context of a scene and analyze what works and why. You can find all the current TV shows that are using songs at www.TuneFind.com.

Based on Shortcuts to Songwriting for Film & TV  by Robin Frederick. Available at Amazon.com.


Copyright 2013 Robin Frederick

 Robin Frederick, songwriter

Robin Frederick has written more than 500 songs for television, records, theater, and audio products. She is a former Director of A&R for Rhino Records, Executive Producer of 60 albums, and the author of “Shortcuts to Hit Songwriting” and “Shortcuts to Songwriting for Film & TV.” Visit Robin's websites for more songwriting tips and inspiration: www.RobinFrederick.com  and www.MySongCoach.com.

 For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, USA Songwriting Competition, Robin Frederick, A&R, Rhino Records

Songwriters Showcase @ Bluebird Cafe

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, May 27, 2013 @04:05 PM

USA Songwriting Competition presented a showcase at the world renowned "Bluebird Cafe" in Nashville, TN on May 9th, 2013. 

Here are some video highlights:

 Maddy Rodriguez (Canada)

 

 

 

Will Hopkins Performing

 

Songwriters Performing at USA Songwriting Competition&squot;s showcase at the famed "Bluebird Cafe", in Nashville, TN

(from left: Bill DiLuigi, Sherri Gough, Maddy Rodriguez, and Berteal)

 

Jonathan Ferreri with Ashley Upton (1st Prize Winner, Country & Overall 2nd Prize Winner)

  Jonathan Ferreri with Ashley Upton (1st Prize Winner, Country & Overall 2nd Prize Winner)
 

Tom Schreck (Honorable Mention Winner)
  Tom Schreck (Honorable Mention Winner)
 

Dale Allen Pommer (Honorable Mention Winner)
  Dale Allen Pommer (Honorable Mention Winner)

Will Hopkins (Finalist)
  Will Hopkins (Finalist)

Songwriters Group Shot

From left to right: John Ferrarri, Ashley Upton,Chris Upton,Bill DiLuigi,(squatting, Liz Miller) Sherri Gough, Berteal,Maddy Rodriguez, Will Hopkins and Dale Allen Pommer. — with Jonathan Ferreri, Bill DiLuigi, Lizzie Miller, Sherri Gough, Berteal, Maddy Rodríguez and Will Hopkins at Songwriters Showcase @ Bluebird Cafe.

 

For more videos, see: http://www.youtube.com/usasongcomp 

View more pictures here >>

 

 

 

For more information on the USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Sherri Gough, Bluebird Cafe, Tom Schreck, USA Songwriting Competition, Will Hopkins, Jonathan Ferreri, Bill DiLuigi, Ashley Upton, Maddy Rodriguez, Dale Allen Pommer, Berteal

USA Songwriting Competition Entry Forms in Various Languages

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Sun, May 19, 2013 @11:14 AM

USA Songwriting Competition has entry forms in more foreign languages due to the requests from songwriters and composers all over the world. We now have entry forms in languages of Japanese, Korean, Chinese (both simplified and complicated characters for China & Taiwan), Italian, French, Spanish, German, Portuguese, etc:

Tags: USA Songwriting Competition, Entry Forms, Español, Deutsch, Français, Português, Italiano

2012 USA Songwriting Competition Radio Podcast

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Apr 05, 2012 @04:29 PM

 

Tune in to the 2012 USA Songwriting Competition Podcast, featuring of the winners of the USA Songwriting Competition (past & present). Click on the audio player above to listen to the music (See Above)

Music featured in this podcast by:

Alexander Cardinale, singer-songwriter

Alexander Cardinale & Morgan Taylor – Traffic Lights (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Pop & Overall 2nd Prize)

Gabriel Mann – Lighted Up (2002 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Orly Forman & Yagel Sulchiner, performed by Orly – Boy on a Hill (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Molly Hunt, Troy Johnson & Jack Williams, performed by Molly Hunt – Go There (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Country & Overall 3rd Prize)

Simon Spire – A Four-Letter Word (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Nenna Yvonne - Go Around (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Ed Romanoff, Crit Harmon & Mary Gauthier – Breakfast for One on the 5th of July (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Lyrics)

Patrice Pike, Wayne Sutton, Sean Phillips & Darrell Phillips, performed by Patrice Pike and “Sister Seven” – My Three Wishes (2004 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Nianell - Finally (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Gospel/Inspirational)

USA Songwriting Competition promotes the art & excellence in songwriting. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, American Idol, USA Songwriting Competition, Billboard Charts, Alexander Cardinale, Radio Podcast, Gabriel Mann, Orly, Molly Hunt, Simon Spire, Nenna Yvonne, Ed Romanoff, Patrice Pike, Nianell

Songwriters Showcase During SXSW (Videos & Pictures)

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @10:00 AM

Songwriters Showcase During SXSW

(Pictures by Mike Abb)

USA Songwriting Competition hosted a songwriters showcase last Friday (3/16/2012) at a beautiful scenic venue at the banks of the lake in Austin's Mozart's Coffee Roasters, with over 200 people in attendance. See Videos:

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition & Overall 2nd Prize):

 

 Video of Ed Romanoff (1st Prize Winner - Lyrics, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition):

 

Video of: Orly (2011 USA Songwriting Competition, First Prize Winner, Folk):

 

Video of: Patrick Joseph Trio:

 

Pictured as follows:

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition)

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition & Overall 2nd Prize)

 

Ed Romanoff, First Prize (Lyrics), 2011 Winner, Singer-Songwriter

Ed Romanoff (1st Prize Winner - Lyrics, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition)

 

Orly, Folk singer-songwriter

Orly (2011 USA Songwriting Competition, First Prize Winner, Folk)

 

Patrick Joseph, singer-songwriter

Patrick Joseph, performing as a trio. 

 

Watch out in the space for more pictures and videos. Thank you for all that performed and came to the showcase. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, USA Songwriting Competition, Alexander Cardinale, sxsw, 2012, Orly & Yagel, Patrick Joseph, South By South West

Every Place Is Home: A Magical Songwriting Co-write

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Oct 06, 2011 @01:22 PM

Every Place Is Home: A Magical Co-write by Melissa Axel

Songwriters Melissa Axel and Andy White, photo by James Jacoby

After my last blog article about the power of co-writing, I was asked to share an experience of how one successful co-write came together. This is the story of "Every Place Is Home," a song from my new album LOVE . HUMANITY . METAMORPHOSIS …

A few years ago, my husband James Jacoby and I were awarded scholarships to participate in a songwriting workshop held in the United Kingdom by the WOMAD Foundation. Short for "World of Music, Arts and Dance," WOMAD was co-founded by Peter Gabriel in 1980 to create awareness of the potential of a multicultural society through festivals and educational projects. It was at one of these programs that we met Irish singer-songwriter Andy White, who was leading the songwriting workshop. A year later we attended again, and there Andy, James, and I co-wrote the song "Every Place Is Home" in a flurry of inspiration.

Each day of the workshop, the songwriters gathered in a small 14th century castle tower to share their original songs and team up to create new ones. Co-writing began with a lyric brainstorming session, a process we've affectionately nicknamed "songstorming." Andy placed huge sheets of paper on a big group of tables, and in the center of each sheet was an art image. Ten songwriters walked around the tables examining the artwork and doodling bits of lyrics near any image that sparked an idea, later copying down favorite phrases into the notebooks Andy had given us. The first image of a single chair by a table in an empty room immediately caught my eye.

Words came first, but almost immediately a melody started to form along with them: "if I play for one, I play for all / from this truth I cannot stray" and then, "fill this empty space with what my soul creates / let this mind just fall away." As James and I walked around the tables, each piece of art drew out more lyric ideas: "sweeping landscape, surreal sunscape, urban faire and country rain" and "in the shadow of our big dreams, we built a love that will sustain." We had driven through Iceland for several days before arriving in the UK, so the more scenic images on the table reminded us of the trip, as well as the English countryside on our train ride from London to Bath.

After the "songstorming" session, James and I compared notes in a practice room. We had both written about our journey: traveling the world, connecting through music and creativity, always feeling at home with each other and the friends we met along the way. We quickly worked out a chorus together: "we don't need to find one way to go / all we need is love, open sea and road / we don't need a place to call our own / when every place is home." By this point, I knew that this would not be one of my typical piano songs.

Even though I've never played guitar, in my head I was hearing a steady picking rhythm. Andy opened our door to check on us, 12-string guitar in tow, and we quickly brought him into the fold. I told him we needed a guitar pattern that would evoke the feeling of riding along on a train. Imagine my euphoria when he immediately played what I was hearing in my head! Forty minutes later, the three of us had fine-tuned the melody, written a bridge (or as they say across the pond, the "middle eight" bars), and were rehearsing away, ready to make a demo recording.

Sometimes a song just comes magically, without warning or even very much effort. Who knows how or why certain words, ideas, and notes come to us to put life's experiences together in a poetic and relatable way that will hopefully touch people for years to come. Yes, we spent a little time honing the lyrics and melody a bit, making adjustments to the chord progression as we went. But in this case, we can truly say that the muse spoke, and we all just happened to be in the right place at the right time to help capture her magic.

Melissa Axel is an Artist Relations representative of USA Songwriting Competition. At just eight years of age, she was writing songs about the bittersweet journey of life, love, struggle, and inspiration. The piano-driven singer/songwriter studied at Boston's renowned Berklee College of Music and went on to earn her master's degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Nova Southeastern University. Axel's new album LOVE . HUMANITY . METAMORPHOSIS is reminiscent of Regina Spektor, Norah Jones, and Tori Amos. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, USA Songwriting Competition, WOMAD, Peter Gabriel, Melissa Axel, co-write, Andy White

Networking in the Songwriting Business by Doak Turner

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 @01:02 PM

Networking in the Songwriting Business by Doak Turner 


Doak Turner
You are at songwriting round, open mic, showcase, CMA Week party, Jason Blume BMI workshop, NSAI Song camp, ASCAP Party, 3rd Sunday at 3 event or other networking event in Nashville. You attend the event to meet songwriters and other industry professionals, and want to be prepared and leave a great impression on the people that you meet. 

Start by introducing yourself and ask about the other person. Maybe tell them you enjoyed their songs, or ask how long they have been in Nashville, or other small talk. Take an interest in the other person, and DO NOT tell them what a great songwriter that YOU are, or hand them your CD and ask them to listen to your songs! This is a relationship town, and you need to show an interest in other people, take the time to get to know them, and the time will be right to play your songs for that person. Do NOT meet a hit songwriter at The Bluebird Café or other venue, introduce yourself and hand them your CD. This is a relationship town – just tell them you enjoyed their songs and you look forward to seeing them around town – as you will, at the YMCA, grocery store, another songwriting event or someone’s party in the future. You want them to like you, not avoid you because you hand them a CD and ask them to write with you – which is another Not To Do Thing! Hey – a great book that will help you with those topics is “The Do’s & Don’ts of Music Row” by Liz Hengber. Read that book!

Now, it is time to exchange business cards, and you want to be prepared and do not want to fumble through a pocket full of everyone else's cards you have collected that particular day, trying to find one of your cards that does not have scribbled notes on it. One networking tip is to have Your Business Cards in your Left pocket, and Everyone Else's Cards in your Right pocket. Always have a pen in your pocket and take notes from your conversation, after you have said your, “see you around town¨ or “I will call you next week and set a co-writing appointment¨, or whatever happens during your conversation. 

Speaking of business cards, your card should include your name, phone number, PO Box or address, website AND e-mail address, and be easy to read. Be sure to include your e-mail address on every business card. If you just have your website address, you are asking people to spend the time (most won't take this extra time) to go to your website, find the contact section and then send you an e-mail. Do not have fancy music logos such as music notes on your business card, unless maybe it is your company logo. You should have your personal music business card, not your day job company business card, if you work outside of the music business. 

I mention PO Box and offer this tip for everyone in Nashville. Go to the Acklen Post office in Hillsboro Village (behind the Sunset Grill) and obtain your personal PO Box. About 99% of Music Row receives their mail at this location, and this can prove to be a great networking location. I have made several contacts, a co-write or two appointment after running into people that I met previously, and several acquaintances from standing in line, or just saying hello at this post office location. 

Another unique networking tip for your business card is when you see someone looking for a piece of paper or something to write on at an event, offer your card and a pen that you should always have in your pocket at these events. Tell that person to use the BACK of your business card to write notes. I do this all the time, and got a call one day from a pro songwriter telling me that he had six of my cards in his wallet from the previous evening's event. I asked him if he thought it was a coincidence, “I don't think so”! 

The key to networking is being prepared before you get to the event. Always have a positive attitude at the event, ask positive questions instead of dwelling on how tough it is, how it is not fair, or you do not understand why your songs are not on the radio. I may ask a question like, “What is happening good for your songwriting world¨ or “What is happening good in your life these days¨? This will get the other person off on a good note and they may want to spend a couple extra minutes talking to you. 

I like to arrive early at an event and get a plate of munchies or the food they are serving at the showcases. This prevents you from trying to talk to everyone, shake hands and do the business card exchange while holding a plate in one hand and a drink in the other hand. 

Always strive to have fun at the events, meet new people, learn something new and just enjoy the experiences on this journey of songwriting! Best wishes for your music journey and I will see you networking in Nashville! 
Click me
Doak Turner is a songwriter in Nashville, TN and he has hosted the USA Songwriting Competition's showcase at the Bluebird Cafe in the past. He has songs on independent CD projects, former 6-year local coordinator in the NSAI Charlotte workshop, produced several successful songwriting events. For information on USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net
 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Nashville, USA Songwriting Competition, NSAI, doak turner, Networking, Songwriting Business

Songwriting Tip: In Defense Of The Title

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, May 12, 2011 @12:57 PM

In Defense Of The Title

by Mark Cawley

Mark Cawley, Songwritier Advice

As songwriters we’re all paying attention to lyric, melody, structure, rhyme scheme, groove, track and more. In coaching writers I usually find the last thing a young writer considers is “the idea”. What is the song about? Is it an idea that will make a listener want to discover the song, listen further and get you beyond the dreaded “nice” comment? Is it relatable?

 

Sometimes it starts with a title, I admit to being a title writer. I think if the title gets people to listen to the song, open the book, try the movie then we have a leg up.

 

Not to say that every great song has to have a clever title but it sure can help a co-write get off the ground, give your subconscious something to work on or make a publisher pick your CD out of the pile.

 

I have to share one instance with you of a title really working. Years ago I moved to Nashville and while most of my success was in Pop music, especially in the UK at that time, I was getting country cuts. I was writing with Hall Of Fame songwriter Kye Fleming, still one of my best friends and the best pure lyricist I know. So.. we were stuck and she suggested we take a break in the middle of the day and go see a movie. We went to see Jerry Maguire. You remember, the “show me the money” movie.

 

The theatre was mostly empty aside from a few songwriters and music folk we both knew. Midway through the movie René Zellweger looks at Tom Cruise and says...."you had me at hello”. Kye elbowed me and said, “watch this”. Sure enough 4 people got up and made their way out, in the middle of the movie. They knew they had found their idea, or the perfect title. In her wisdom Kye told me that they would all go write it, a couple will demo it, a few publishers will get it to producers and one will be a hit in 6 months!

 

Around 6 months later Kenny Chesney had a number one called “you had me from hello”.

 

I still keep a running list of anything that remotely sounds like an opening line, great title or just a good idea.

 

One Nashville writer I know always cautioned me to “make sure the journey was worth the destination.” Don’t just depend on the twist or the hook to carry a song but make sure every part of lyric is seamless leading up to the big idea. In other words, a great title on it’s own is not a great lyric. Good advice!

 

Mark Cawleys’ songs have appeared on more than 15 million records. Over a career based in LA, London and Nashville his songs have been recorded by an incredibly diverse range of artists. From Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross and Chaka Kahn to The Spice Girls, Tom Scott, Kathy Mattea, Paul Carrack, Will Downing and Pop Idol winners in the UK and around the world. He has had #1 records in the UK and throughout Europe as well as cut’s in Country, Jazz & R & B. His groundbreaking website “Song Journey” created with Hall of Fame writer Kye Fleming was the first to mentor writers from around the world one on one online. He is currently writing and publishing as well as helping writers and artists in the US, UK and Australia with a new one on one co-active coaching service. Visit www.idocoach.com for details.

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, USA Songwriting Competition, Mark Cawley, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross, Chaka Kahn, The Spice Girls, Tom Scott, Kathy Mattea, Paul Carrack, Will Downing

Photos From USA Songwriting Competition's Showcase During SXSW

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Apr 28, 2011 @08:06 PM

In response to all of you that have asked, here are the pictures of our songwriters showcase during SXSW Week in Austin, TX at Barnes & Noble book store:

 

Dave Merena Performing at songwriters showcase during SXSW

Dave Merenda (2010 USA Songwriting Competition)

 

 

Drew Jacobs

Drew Jacobs (2010 USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Novelty category)

 

Jacinta

Jacinta (2010 USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Dance/Electronica)

 

Raleigh Hall & Ian Holmes

Raleigh Hall & Ian Holmes (2010 USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Gospel)

 

Shane Cooley

Shane Cooley (2010 USA Songwriting Competition, Finalist)

 

Melissa Greener

Melissa Greener (2008 USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Folk)

 

For videos of the showcase, please click here:

http://www.youtube.com/usasongcomp

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Melissa Greener, USA Songwriting Competition, sxsw, Songwriter Showcase, Shane Cooley, Raleigh Hall, Ian Holmes, Jacinta, Drew Jacobs, Dave Merenda