Songwriting Tips, News & More

Songwriters' Versions Of Original Songs

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Apr 16, 2012 @12:01 PM

Songwriters' Versions Of Original Songs

by Jessica Brandon

Ken Hirsch, songwriter
Ever wondered how the orginal songwriters sounded like? These are versions of various hit songs sung by the orginal songwriters, many of them are not music artists but songwriters.


Diane Warren singing "Look Away" and "I Get Weak". "Look Away" is the name of a 1989 #1 Billboard Hot 100 Chart hit written by Diane Warren. "I Get Weak" is a pop song written by Diane Warren and produced by Rick Nowels for Belinda Carlisle's second album Heaven on Earth. The song reached number 2 on the US Billboard Charts

 

Ken Hirsch performing "I've Never Been To Me" at USA Songwriting Competition showcase's at Bluebird Cafe, Nashville, TN on May 5 2011. He co-wrote this song with Ron Miller (writer of #1 hit ""Touch Me in the Morning"):

 

Shirley Eikhard performing "Something To Talk About", a song that became Bonnie Raitt's biggest hit and highest charted song in her career:

 

Legendary songwriter Burt Bacharach performs "Alfie". "Alfie" is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David in 1965 most successfully recorded by Cher, Cilla Black and Dionne Warwick.


USA Songwriting Competition promotes the art & excellence in songwriting. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

 

Tags: Ken Hirsch, Diane Warren, Burt Bacharach, Shirley Eikhard, Look Away, I Get Weak, Something To Talk About, Alfie, I've Never Been To Me

2012 USA Songwriting Competition Radio Podcast

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Apr 05, 2012 @04:29 PM

 

Tune in to the 2012 USA Songwriting Competition Podcast, featuring of the winners of the USA Songwriting Competition (past & present). Click on the audio player above to listen to the music (See Above)

Music featured in this podcast by:

Alexander Cardinale, singer-songwriter

Alexander Cardinale & Morgan Taylor – Traffic Lights (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Pop & Overall 2nd Prize)

Gabriel Mann – Lighted Up (2002 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Orly Forman & Yagel Sulchiner, performed by Orly – Boy on a Hill (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Molly Hunt, Troy Johnson & Jack Williams, performed by Molly Hunt – Go There (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Country & Overall 3rd Prize)

Simon Spire – A Four-Letter Word (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Nenna Yvonne - Go Around (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Ed Romanoff, Crit Harmon & Mary Gauthier – Breakfast for One on the 5th of July (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Lyrics)

Patrice Pike, Wayne Sutton, Sean Phillips & Darrell Phillips, performed by Patrice Pike and “Sister Seven” – My Three Wishes (2004 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Nianell - Finally (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Gospel/Inspirational)

USA Songwriting Competition promotes the art & excellence in songwriting. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, American Idol, USA Songwriting Competition, Billboard Charts, Alexander Cardinale, Radio Podcast, Gabriel Mann, Orly, Molly Hunt, Simon Spire, Nenna Yvonne, Ed Romanoff, Patrice Pike, Nianell

Getting Your First Big Yes In Songwriting

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @12:15 PM

Getting Your First Big Yes In Songwriting

By Molly-Ann Leikin

 Molly-Ann Leikin, Songwriting Co-writer, Song Marketing Consultant

This morning, as I took my walk up the hill behind my house, I realized that if I stacked all the no’s I’ve been told from day one, they would block the Alps.

 

On the other hand, the yeses would barely make it past my ankle.

 

Nonetheless, I am enjoying a great career in the music business.

 

Over the years, I’ve probably heard more no’s than most songwriters, because I wasn’t a groupie, I wore a bra, didn’t do drugs, and I wasn’t anybody’s daughter.

 

But after seven years of “you can’t be serious,” a publisher at Warner Brothers asked me to write a song for somebody, and I was back with it the next day at 7:24 a.m. Waiting on WB's front step, which is totally out of character for drive-around-the-block-once-then-split me, I was cool when WB guy rolled in at eleven. He didn’t use my song that time, but he appreciated my passion. After 398.2 days of this, he signed me a staffwriter.

 

Yes, I am talented. But everybody's talented. I just wanted it more.

 

Do you?

 

© 2012 Molly-Ann Leikin

Molly-Ann Leikin is an Emmy nominee. The author of “How to Write A Hit Song” and “How to Be A Hit Songwriter”, she has written themes and songs for over five dozen TV shows and movies, including “Violet” that won an Oscar. Through co-writing and song marketing consultations, four of Molly’s clients have Grammy nominations, another won an Emmy, and so far, with Molly’s help, over 6000 of her other lyricist and composer protégées have placed their work in TV shows, movies, on CD’s and in commercials. Molly would be happy to discuss a co-write or consultation with you: 800-851-6588 songmd@songmd.com www.songmd.com

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Warner Brothers, Molly-Ann Leikin, Song Marketing Consultant, Co-writer, First Big Yes

Songwriting Tip: Sharpen Your Music With The Flat Seven Chord

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Apr 02, 2012 @01:18 PM

SHARPEN YOUR MUSIC WITH THE FLAT SEVEN CHORD by Danny Arena

Danny Arena, Songwriter
There are seven standard chords that are part of every key in which you may be writing a song. In traditional theory, these are known as the "diatonic chords", but you can simply think of them as the chords we tend to gravitate towards first when writing music. The reason is simple - they are the ones we hear the most. However there are also some commonly used chords that are called non-diatonic that turn up in many hit songs. One of these so-called non-diatonic chords is called the flat seven (or flatted seventh) chord. It can be a valuable tool to have in your composer's toolbox.

Formation of the Flat Seven Chord 
The flat seven chord is formed by first determining the seventh note of the scale of the key in which you are writing your song. Lower this note by a half-step (also known as "flatting" the note) and you have the flat seven. For example, in the key of C, the flat seven would be a Bb chord. In the key of G, the flat seven chord would be an F major chord. 

How It's Used 
The flat seven is generally used in one of two ways. First, the flat seven chord can also be used as a "surprise" chord, where you set the listener up to hear a certain chord, but give them the flat seven chord instead as a "surprise". This is how Jimmy Webb first popularized the use of the flat seven chord (in fact, the flat seven chord is also known as the Jimmy Webb 7th). The bridge in the Grammy winning song "Beauty and the Beast" (songwriter - Menken/Ashman) uses the flat seven as a surprise chord as does the Faith Hill classic hit "This Kiss" (songwriter - R. Lerner/B. Chapman/A. Roboff) which incorporates the flat seven chord in the verse chord progression. 

An Example 
Let's say you are writing a song in the key of C and have the following chord progression for the verse (1 chord per measure): 

C F C F
Em Am F G

One way to surprise the listener would be to play a flat seven chord (Bb) instead of the F chord in the seventh measure. Another way to surprise the listener would be to play the Bb chord in the 8th measure after the F chord, and use an extra measure for the G chord.

So the next time you're looking for a little different twist on an old progression or just a different chord to start that chorus or bridge on, don't overlook the flat seven chord - it's really pretty sharp (sorry for the pun there...I couldn't resist). 

Hope to see you on the charts. 

-Danny

About Danny Arena

Danny Arena is a Tony Award nominated composer who has worked as a staff songwriter for Warner/Chappell Music and Curb Magnatone Music Publishing. He holds degrees from Rutgers University in both computer science and music composition. He is currently an Associate Professor at Volunteer State Community College in Nashville and has been a member of the faculty at Vanderbilt University as well as a guest lecturer at the Berklee College of Music and Belmont University. Together Danny and Sara collaborated on composing songs for the Broadway show "Urban Cowboy: The Musical" which was nominated for an Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Musical and a Tony Award for Best Original Score. He is also the co-founders of the online educational website www.SongU.com which provides multi-level songwriting courses developed and taught by award-winning songwriters, song feedback and mentoring, one-on-one song coaching, co-writing, unscreened pitching opportunities and more. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, visit:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting Tip, songwrite, Flat Seven Chord

Songwriting Tip: Ya Gotta Move...Yourself !!

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 27, 2012 @03:03 PM

Songwriting Tip: Ya Gotta Move...Yourself !! 

By Mark Cawley

Mark Cawley, songwriter

One of the most valuable lessons I learned over years in writing for artists, writing with artists and taking direction from my publisher was to not study too hard.

I learned this the hard way! I’ll go way back for some examples. I was writing for a major publisher during the 90’s, and I knew that part of my job was to stay current. I would shoot for the biggest artists of the day and usually had a heads up on direction from my publisher, other writers and even producers.

I’ve always loved great singers and found it easy to hear their voice in my head when I was working on something to pitch for them. Rod Stewart, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Aretha Franklin, Wynonna, Chaka Khan...I was a channeling fool. For years cuts were coming along but the ones I really wanted were eluding me. I would listen to everything they’d done, groove, key, subject matter and try to nail something I could hear them doing. What I didn’t think about is a really, really great artist isn’t looking for “something that sounds just like them”.

During these years I can’t tell you how many songs were put on hold by the powers that be thinking the song ( and demo) sounded exactly like their artist. At the 11th hour something would usually go amiss. You may have been there. Everything looks perfect, time to start spending the money you’re going to see...nothing to it, I’ve done my homework, my 10,000 hours and damn it...I deserve it!

As you know you need a thick skin and crazy confidence to take the rejection this career will hand out so I would grieve for a time and then jump back in. Then a funny thing happened....

As I was writing for the market I was also getting with better and better co-writers. We had the same war stories but if we wrote long enough we would eventually say let’s forget it and just write what we want, something that we can walk away and say “ I don’t care if this ever get’s cut. Then they did. In a short period of time Tina, Joe, Chaka and Wynonna cut songs that didn’t sound remotely like ones written “for” them. All songs I was proud of. Sometimes it was a creative publisher who had the imagination to hear a song as the next step for an artist even when all the powers that be said they were nuts for sending them a song so different than what was being asked for. Sometimes it was using one of those people in your network, whatever it took to get the artist to hear it.

So the big lesson for me was a true artist is trying to move forward, not repeat themselves. They want to be challenged and they want to challenge a listener or fan. Usually they don’t know what form that will take until they hear it but if the song moved you first maybe you can move them and hopefully they can move a few million other people and then...you can take that to the bank!

© Mark Cawley, Nashville, TN 3/20/12


Mark Cawleys’ songs have appeared on more than 15 million records. Over a career based in LA, London and Nashville his songs have been recorded by an incredibly diverse range of artists. From Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross and Chaka Kahn to The Spice Girls, Tom Scott, Kathy Mattea, Paul Carrack, Will Downing and Pop Idol winners in the UK and around the world. He has had #1 records in the UK and throughout Europe as well as cut’s in Country, Jazz & R & B. His groundbreaking website “Song Journey” created with Hall of Fame writer Kye Fleming was the first to mentor writers from around the world one on one online. He is currently writing and publishing as well as helping writers and artists in the US, UK and Australia with a new one on one co-active coaching service. Visit www.idocoach.com for details. For more details on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Mark Cawley, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, The Spice Girls, Kathy Mattea, Diana Ross and Chaka Kahn

Neon Hitch Speaks on Songwriting/Collaboration

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Mar 22, 2012 @12:46 PM

Neon Hitch, singer songwriter talks about her experience as a songwriter in collaboration with hit makers: 

USA Songwriting Competition caught up with Warner Brothers Recording Artist Neon Hitch at the Winter Music Conference in Miami Beach, Florida. She is a British singer and songwriter. She talked about songwriting and collaborations with hit makers such as Bruno Mars, Gym Class Heroes, 3OH!3 and Mike Posner. She had 2 songs that hit the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.

She was signed to Mike Skinner and Ted Mayhem's label, The Beats, before it closed down. She was later discovered on MySpace by Benny Blanco who flew her to New York to work with him. Their work together earned her a music publishing deal with EMI and a record deal with Warner Brothers Records. 

The Winter Music Conference is a weeklong electronic music conference, held every March since the mid-1980s in Miami Beach, Florida. 

The WMC is recognized for serving over 62,000 attendees from 70 countries in Miami Beach to get involved in the WMC week. Over 4,000 industry delegates attended, Record label representatives, publishers, and A&R attend the conference.

USA Songwriting Competition's event director Eddie Phoon (pictured below with Neon Hitch) spoke as a panelist at WMC Demo Listening Workshops and South Beach Sessions, which included legendary music producer Henry Stone. 

 

Singer Songwriter Neon Hitch With Event Director Eddie Phoon, at WMC (Winter Music Conference) in Miami Beach

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, Neon Hitch, singer, Warner Brothers, Bruno Mars, Gym Class Heroes, 3OH!3, Mike Posner

Music Gear: iRig™ MIX and DJ Rig, iPhone app with Hardware

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @11:23 AM


 IK Multimedia at WMC (Winter Music Conference)

IK Multimedia showcased 2 new products (See Video above) at the 2012 WMC (Winter Music Conference) in Miami Beach on March 19, 2012:

iRig™ MIX
The first mobile mixer for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. iRig™ MIX is the first mobile mixer for iPhone, iPod touch or iPad devices. iRig MIX offers the same controls you would expect from a professional DJ mixer (crossfader, cues, EQ and volume controls, etc.) in an ultra-compact mobile mixer that can be used with a huge variety of iOS DJ mixing and other apps. iRig MIX is a DJ mixer that allows DJs to use a traditional setup with two devices (one plugged into each of the independent channels) OR a single iOS device. For the single iOS device setup, the output of the single device is split into dual-mono and sent to the individual channels. Additionally – for the first time on any DJ mixer - iRig MIX can be used for mixing any type of audio source (coming from mp3 players, CD players, etc.) with an iOS device using automatic tempo matching and beat syncing. This is accomplished with X-Sync, a feature that works in combination with the DJ Rig free app from IK Multimedia that is included with iRig MIX.


DJ Rig
The pro-quality DJ mixing app. DJ Rig is a full-featured, double-deck DJ mixing app for iPhone. DJ Rig provides instant song playback from the device's music library, tempo sync, sample-based pads, performance recording and an arsenal of high-quality DJ effects. Together with the iRig MIX, DJ Rig provides the most portable pro-quality setup for mobile DJs and musicians.

DJ Rig stands out from the crowd of DJ apps for its complete set of professional features including some that cannot be found in any other app such as X-Sync. This mode allows anybody to automatically synchronize the app audio with any other external audio source. DJ Rig “listens” to the device's audio input, determines its BPM tempo and syncs the app audio automatically. Read more about iRig™ MIX and DJ Rig at:  http://www.ikmultimedia.com/irigmix/moreinfo/djrig.php

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Music Gear, iRig MIX, DJ Rig, iPhone app, Hardware, IK Multimedia

Songwriters Showcase During SXSW (Videos & Pictures)

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @10:00 AM

Songwriters Showcase During SXSW

(Pictures by Mike Abb)

USA Songwriting Competition hosted a songwriters showcase last Friday (3/16/2012) at a beautiful scenic venue at the banks of the lake in Austin's Mozart's Coffee Roasters, with over 200 people in attendance. See Videos:

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition & Overall 2nd Prize):

 

 Video of Ed Romanoff (1st Prize Winner - Lyrics, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition):

 

Video of: Orly (2011 USA Songwriting Competition, First Prize Winner, Folk):

 

Video of: Patrick Joseph Trio:

 

Pictured as follows:

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition)

Alexander Cardinale (1st Prize Winner - Pop, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition & Overall 2nd Prize)

 

Ed Romanoff, First Prize (Lyrics), 2011 Winner, Singer-Songwriter

Ed Romanoff (1st Prize Winner - Lyrics, 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition)

 

Orly, Folk singer-songwriter

Orly (2011 USA Songwriting Competition, First Prize Winner, Folk)

 

Patrick Joseph, singer-songwriter

Patrick Joseph, performing as a trio. 

 

Watch out in the space for more pictures and videos. Thank you for all that performed and came to the showcase. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, USA Songwriting Competition, Alexander Cardinale, sxsw, 2012, Orly & Yagel, Patrick Joseph, South By South West

Songwriting Tip: Planting Positive Seed

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Mar 19, 2012 @12:00 PM

Planting Positive Seed

By Daylle Deanna Schwartz

 Daylle Deanna Schwartz

Trying to succeed in a creative endeavor can feel futile at times, if not often. Doors close and people don’t respond to what you send them or to return calls. Your gig didn’t go well, your efforts to get your music licensed haven’t gotten you anywhere or your band mates are giving you a hard time. It can make you feel lost about what to do or wanting to give up. I encourage you to do some gardening for your life to up your chances for career opportunities, good people, and other goodies to bloom in profusion for your career.

 

I think of life as a garden. It needs weeding, seeds planted, watering, and fertilizer to help it bloom in ways you want. When you don’t tend your garden it gets out of control. When you don’t tend your thoughts and the seeds you plant, YOU feel out of control of your life. When you do plant the seeds for healthy blossoms and take care of them, your life blooms in a profusion of attracting many blessings.

 

It’s important to be careful not to allow weeds to grow in your garden of self: criticism, pessimism, negative thoughts, frustration, hopelessness, doubt, etc. Some weeds are pretty on the surface and may actually have flowers, which makes it harder to understand they must go. In life, people are like weeds. They may sweet talk you, pump you up about our music, offer to help you but then disappear, and other things that are common.

 

You may think you need someone who has contacts or the money to invest in your music. But if they hold you back as you wait for them to do something—while they make lame excuses for not keeping their word—they’re weeds that need to go! When I was doing my music, there were many weeds who told me what I wanted to hear. I’d get all excited, only to be let down.

 

Weeds can glom onto you in ways that make you keep them around when the thought of doing everything on your own, or trying to find better people, seems like too much work, or too scary. When they throw you a bone to make you continue to deal with them, they're still weeds. When you let them stay and spread, they overpower everything.

 

Weed your garden so your talent can bloom! Awareness is a great weed controller. It helps you spot people who are all talk and no action, don’t keep their word, ask for money with no return, etc. fast and eliminate them. Replace weeds by planting as many seeds as you can that can open doors down the road. Seeds are doing something that could potentially create an opportunity. Every little thing you do that allows another person to be aware of you and your music is a seed that might bloom.

 

Every time you send out your press kit or make a call to pursue a gig or increase your friends on social networking sites, or go to a seminar or take a class to improve your performance or meet other musicians or managers or go to panels with industry pros, or make a new friend or let people know what you need, you create a potential opportunity. Each one is a seed. Think about how seeds spread in the wind to gardens. It’s common for people to get a beautiful flower in their garden that they didn’t plant. The wind carries seeds from one garden to another. It’s the same with action seeds.

 

Every time you do something to advance or connect or let someone know what you’re doing or need, you give yourself another chance to bear the fruit of each seed. The more seeds you plant, the more chances one will sprout. I sent Oprah a press kit a year before they called me to do the show. A producer held onto it and got it out when they needed someone like me for a topic that I have expertise in—a year later! Patience helps you not get discouraged when seeds don’t sprout right away.

 

Many artists tell me they’ve succeeded because they planted as many seeds as possible by getting their music or name to as many folks who might be able to use them as possible. Thinking of each effort as a seed planted keeps you from looking at opportunities that don’t pan out as a waste. IF you have the goods to qualify for what you want, no seed is wasted. You may not hear from the person for a long time, as what happened for me with Oprah. But people who look at their efforts as seeds know that it only take one to sprout before the whole garden can start to bloom.

 

So step out and tend your own garden. Control the weeds of your garden too. You don’t need a green thumb! Look for the weeds and get rid of what you can. Plant as many seeds for what you want as possible. Then take any actions you can and EXPECT them to grow! The more you stay positive and keep believing in your talent, the more opportunities you can attract.

--------------------------

 

Daylle Deanna Schwartz is a speaker, consultant for musicians and record labels, self-empowerment counselor, and best-selling author of 13 books, including the third edition of Start & Run Your Own Record Label (Billboard Books/Random House) and Nice Girls Can Finish First (McGraw-Hill), based on lessons she learned as one of the first women to start a record label. http://www.daylle.com  For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, visit:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: music business, Daylle Deanna Schwartz, Billboard Books, Run Your Own Record Label

Songwriting Tips: Your Best Friend Melody

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, Mar 14, 2012 @12:00 PM

Songwriting Tips: Your Best Friend Melody

by Ralph Murphy

Ralph Murphy, Songwriter

Ah melody! A songwriters best friend, your beacon in the night, an integral part of only great songs that makes your compositions shine, the signpost that points the way to a hit.

 
Yes, melody is all that and more. Perhaps too much more. As I deal with the affect of melody extensively in "The Book" and USA Songwriting Competition has asked me to be brief...I will be.

 
Unless you are dealing with an audience ready to dance and you are looking at 110 to 135 Beats Per Minute (BPM) at midnight, even then, what probably lures listener to you song is melody. However, what keeps them there is lyric, a simple story well told. I have friends tell me that they love this song or that song but they say they don't know the words. When I play "that song" for them surprisingly they know the lyric! What invites the listener into the song is melody, what keeps them there for a long time is lyric.

 
It is an interesting characteristic of the human animal that we are not very good at auditory multi-functioning.......hearing more than one moving part simultaneously. When that happens, given our preference we always defer to melody. So, where you tell your story and you want the audience to listen, remain linear otherwise you don't lead the listener to the lyric.


To quote my old pal Harlan Howard "Don't change your chord 'till you change your thought"!

 

However, on the other side of the coin, as a "creator of works" if you are called on to write for an artist with a huge vocal range and the ability to soar musically is part of their musical "persona" then you respond accordingly. One syllable words, open vowel sounds, minimal story and a huge melody are your best friends.


Always remember, you the writer must fulfill not only the listeners expectation but also the artists perception of the image they wish to project. When that happens it is a wonderful thing, everyone high fives and celebrates. When it doesn't happen the songwriter gets the blame!


Ralph Murphy is a producer and songwriter. He wrote huge hit songs such as Crystal Gayle "Talking in Your Sleep" and "Half the Way". Murphy has served as President of The Nashville Chapter of the Recording Academy and has been a NARAS National Trustee. Add to that the platinum records as a producer, the widely acclaimed Murphy’s Laws of Songwriting articles used as part of curriculum at colleges, universities, and by songwriter organizations, his success as the publisher and co-owner of the extremely successful Picalic Group of Companies and you see a pattern of achievement based on more than luck. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Melody, Ralph Murphy, Crystal Gayle, Songwriting Tips, Harlan Howard, Talking in Your Sleep, Half the Way