Songwriting Tips, News & More

Legendary CBGB's looks for new location, plans NY music festival

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, May 10, 2012 @12:38 PM

 

CBGB, a legendary club in New York, stands for Country, BlueGrass, and Blues.

NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York's legendary punk-rock music venue CBGB's may be on its way back: in a new location with new music. 

New club investors are currently pursuing a permanent downtown Manhattan venue for the club that shuttered its doors in 2006, according to a club spokesman, who emphasized the managers of new venue will not be trying to emulate the past.

"They are hoping to open a new venue focused on new music," the spokesman said. "They are not trying to recreate the past but hope to open a space in the spirit of CBGB."

In addition, the first CBGB music festival will take place over four days from July 5-8 and showcase 300 indie bands at dozens of venues in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as film screenings and panel discussions.

The club that existed on the border of Manhattan's East Village: its full name is CBGB & OMFUG, or Country Bluegrass Blues and Other Music For Uplifting Gormandizers: became the epicenter of the punk-rock scene in the 1970s launching bands like the Ramones, Talking Heads, Television and Blondie. The club has been a 'must play' venue for indie bands until it closed in 2006. 

The closing down of the club after a rental dispute signaled the end of an era and the gentrification of The Bowery area that now houses luxury apartment buildings with modern glass facades. The club's founder, Hilly Kristal, died in 2007, and since then CBGB's was dismantled and only existed to sell club merchandise.

The club's estate, with Kristal's daughter Lisa Kristal Burgman as its co-executor, recently sold the rights to the club's assets to a new group of investors who are currently pursuing the new venue and have planned the annual festival, according to the club spokesman.

"It's a relief to know that it's not going to die," Burgman told the New York Times, who first reported the story and said there was six investors behind the new venture. "It's going to be reborn."

After Kristal's death the club became weighed down in legal disputes over the assets, and Burgman emerged from a legal battle as the co-executor of the estate.

A spokesman for the club did not comment on what the assets sold for. The group of investors purchased the rights to the club's global intellectual property and physical assets.

Kristal founded the club in 1973. Despite its name, the club became a breeding ground for punk and new wave music such as The Jam, The Cramps and Nico, among others.

 

(Edited by Jessica Brandon)

 

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, Songwriting, CBGB, Country, BlueGrass, Blues, Ramones, Misfits, Television, Patti Smith, Blondie

Pictures & Videos of Songwriters Showcase @ Bluebird Cafe

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, May 07, 2012 @03:17 PM

Here are some pictures of our recent showcase at Bluebird Cafe. Thank you all for coming to our showcase: performers, fans and Liz Miller (our Nashville host). 

 

Bluebird Cafe Showcase Showcase Group Picture, USA Songwriting Competition

From Left to right: Phillip Trees,Will Hopkins, Bill DiLuigi, Robert Davis, Tom Schreck and Dale Allen. Kneeling are: Jenn Bostic, Molly Hunt and Host Liz Miller.

 

Robert Davis, songwriter

Robert Davis performing

 

Molly Hunt, singer-songwriter. American Idol Top 60 contestant, USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner (Country)

Molly Hunt, singer-songwriter. She made it to the Top 60 of the 2012 American Idol. She won First Prize (Country) at the 16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition. 

 

Dale Allen, songwriter

Dale Allen performing.

 

Tom Schreck, songwriter

Tom Schreck performing. 

 

 Video: Dale Allen Performing at USA Songwriting Competition showcase at Bluebird Cafe

 

Coming Soon: watch out for our videos. They are being edited at the moment. 

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Jenn Bostic, Tom Schreck, Molly Hunt, Will Hopkins, Liz Miller, Bill DiLuigi, Phillip Trees, Robert Davis, Dale Allen

Songwriters: Make Your Demos Really Pop!

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, May 03, 2012 @11:45 AM

Songwriters: Make Your Demos Really Pop!

 Singers Guide to Powerful Performances

Okay. You’ve written good songs and now it is time to record demos of them. You know that a demo doesn’t need to be perfect, but it has to be good enough to sell your songs to a publisher or be placed in film or TV by a music supervisor. The success of a song reaching the ears of the many will ride on a number of factors, including having a demo that really sells your song, a demo whose vocal is wisely calculated. Here’s how to get it there...

 

The Song That Doesn’t Sell

 

If your demo’s vocal isn’t stylistically believable, the song won’t sell itself. Good songwriting will be obscured, and possibly passed over, when a music supervisor or publisher listens to a song that has off-pitch, weak vocals or vocals that are stylistically incompatible with the music. For example, say you’ve written an R&B song and hope it will be sung by Christina Aguilera. But when you record the demo, your vocal sounds like an old-style cabaret singer with overly precise word articulation and a loose, wide vibrato. Result: The style of your song will be eclipsed and most likely passed over.

 

Who Will Sing Your Song?

 

When a publisher listens to a demo, if s/he can’t envision a certain artist singing it, chances are slim that s/he’ll pick it up and submit it to an artist for consideration. With that in mind, as you write a song or revise it after it has been written, evaluate the style of your song and match it to one or several possible artists you believe could sing it. This brings us to some important steps that many skip entirely or skimp on in their haste to demo and submit their songs.

 

Do Your Research

 

Before you write a song that you hope to have sung and recorded by specific artists, spend time listening to a cross-section of their currently released material to find out: Are there any particular keys or types of melodies they favor? How much or how little vocal range do they tend to use? Do they use mostly single syllable or multi-syllabic words? Are there any characteristic ways they use their voice, such as certain vowel sounds for their peak or climatic notes? Is their vocal bluesy, belting or whispery? Do they use much sustain? Do you hear a certain recurring manner of rhythmic phrasing or a use of embellishments?

Identify all this before you write your song or revise it, so you’ll compose music and lyrics that are stylistically consistent. You will also discover if you have the vocal skill to sing on your demo or if you should have a talented singer record it.

 

Prep Your Vocals

 

If you plan to sing on your demo, doing this simple exercise before you record will help you to improve your sound. Sing the melody of your song without lyrics, phrase by phrase, using a simple vowel sound such as “Ah,”  “Ee” or “Eh.” Don’t connect the notes with an “h.” Instead, keep your vowel pronunciation consistent as you slowly and smoothly sing each phrase.

Doing this has several benefits. 1) By removing the lyrics, you’ll focus on the musical flow of the melody and this will bring to attention any possible musical edits you deem stylistically necessary. 2) Your voice is the vowel sounds (not the consonants of words). This exercise can help to improve your tone and pitch accuracy, because it requires you to work the sound of your voice only. 3) Singing the melody with a single vowel exercises your vocal muscles so you can sing more easily. Once you’ve done this (over and over) to your satisfaction, sing the song with lyrics and notice any improvements. At this point you can begin to stylize your voice to suit the intended artist or song placement.

 

Learn from Singers

 

If you’ve decided to sing on your demo, but your vocal style doesn’t complement the genre of the song, practice with recordings of singers who sing in that genre. Record yourself so you can compare your rendition to those other singers and make adjustments as needed.

 

Studio Recording Tips

 

There are two important studio factors that either enhance or diminish your recorded vocals. Take the time to get the right headphone mix. You should hear yourself well and not feel “crowded” by the volume of other instruments. If needed, try the “one ear off” technique; Leave the headphone off one ear to hear your voice acoustically in the room.

The type of mic chosen and the mic’s placement should match rather than alter your voice and it should capture your best sound. When using your home studio to record, the standard microphone input on your computer is usually inadequate to make good quality vocal recordings. Use a separate audio interface with a preamp or, for the more budget-conscious, use a USB studio condenser microphone.

 

Remain Objective

 

While it may be difficult to remain objective, the whole project will fail if you do not evaluate your recording with a professional detachment that can discern stylistic consistency, perform-ance believability and accuracy of pitch and rhythmic phrasing. If the first two in-gredients are there, the pitch and rhythm can be fixed by punches or corrected in the recording software.

 songwriting

Vocals Still Sound Bad?

 

If you have followed all these suggestions and the vocals still don’t sound as good as they need to, it is time to acknowledge that you may not be the right singer for this recording. Your skill is songwriting and you want the quality of your art to be evident to others, so find an appropriate singer to record your demo.

There are some talented singers out there who will jump at the chance to get studio experience, an endorsement or even possibly a demo recording of their own. You can find singers through contacting voice coaches in your area, online musician referral services or bulletin boards, by referral from recording studios, other musicians you may know and through Music Connection’s musician’s online social network: AMP (http://musicconnection.com/amp).

You can offer to pay a singer or possibly draw up an agreement allowing them to use the recording as a demo to showcase their voice as long as they don’t sell or record the song as their own. Your song should already be copyright protected prior to going into the studio.

[Reprinted with permission by Music Connection magazine]

Jeannie Deva is recognized as one of the nation’s top celebrity voice and performance coaches. As a recording studio vocal specialist, she has been endorsed by producers and engineers of Aerosmith, Elton John, Fleetwood Mac and the Rolling Stones. Her newest book publication is Singer’s Guide to Powerful Performances. See http://JeannieDeva.com. 

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, demo, Elton John, Studio Recording Tips, Jeannie Deva, Fleetwood Mac, Rolling Stones

Songwriting Tip: How Does Your Song Stack Up?

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Wed, May 02, 2012 @11:40 AM

HOW DOES YOUR SONG STACK UP?

Danny Arena, Songwriter

Every now and then, I like to tape the entire country top 40 and analyze the songs in terms of song structure and various timing considerations. In this column, I wanted to share with you the results of my most recent survey.

1. Song Form. Everyone says write your song in a song form. Maybe you've wondered just how important that is to making the top 40? Well as usual, out of forty songs on this particular week when I analyzed them, every one was written in one of the well established song forms. 

Form Number of Songs in the Top 40
AAA none
AABA 9
Verse/Chorus 15
Verse/Chorus/Bridge 7
Verse/Lift/Chorus 7
Verse/Lift/Chorus/Bridge 2

As has been the case the past three years, the majority of songs in the top 40 used the simple verse/chorus structure (though some included instrumental sections). Second place was very close, with the AABA's getting the nod by a slim margin, followed closely by the V/C/B structure and the V/L/C structure. As you might expect, there were no AAA songs, although one or two a year usually make their way into the top 40.

II. Length Of Introduction. How long should an introduction to a song be? The introduction should be long enough to establish the feel and tempo of the song, and possibly introduce a motif. Anything longer, and your introduction is simply taking up valuable space in the song and probably hurting the song. 

Length of Introduction # of Songs in the Top 40
< 10 seconds 8
11 - 15 seconds 25
16 - 17 seconds 7
> 17 seconds none

Average length = 12 seconds

The fascinating statistic here is that twenty-five of the forty songs fell into the second category and no songs had introductions longer than seventeen seconds. 

III. Time To Get To The Chorus (including the introduction). Okay, so we've all heard the expression, "don't bore us, get to the chorus". Let's see how the songs in the top 40 compared on this very important timing issue.

Time To Get To The Chorus # of Songs in the Top 40
< 30 seconds 4
30 - 40 seconds 10
41 - 50 seconds 11 
51 - 60 seconds 10
61 - 75 seconds 5
> 75 seconds none

Average time = 45 seconds

There were only five songs in the top 40 that took longer than a minute to get to the chorus. Out of those five songs, three were written or co-written by the artist. Take a tip from the top 40 and get to the chorus in under a minute.

IV. Length Of Song (including the introduction). Finally, let's take a look at song length. 

Length of Song # of Songs in the Top 40
< 2:30 none
2:30 - 3:00 11
3:00 - 3:30 25 
3:30 - 4:00 4
> 4:00 none

Average time = 3:17 seconds

This category changed the most from last year. Last year, the average time for a song was right around the three minute mark. This year, the majority of songs were in the 3:00-3:30 category. It will be interesting to see whether this trend continues.

V. What It All Means. So what do all these statistics mean? While I don't recommend putting your song under a microscope during the writing of it, it is interesting after your song is written to see whether or not it falls into the "pocket". If you notice that your song takes over a minute to get to the chorus, you may want to consider getting there quicker. If your song is in an obscure song form (like one you made up yourself), be aware that not many of those make it to the top 40. In the end, there are always exceptions to the rule and knowing the above information should not be a guiding factor in compromising the writing of a song. But it can help give you a healthy perspective after the writing of the song. Most of all, just keep writing the best songs you possibly can.

Hope to see you on the charts.

-Danny

About Danny Arena:
Danny Arena is a Tony Award nominated composer and professional songwriter. He holds degrees from Rutgers University in both computer science and music composition, and serves as an Associate Professor at Volunteer State Community College in Nashville, and an adjunct member of the faculty at Vanderbilt University. In addition, he has been invited to teach songwriting workshops throughout the U.S. and abroad, and performs his original songs regularly in Nashville at venues like the Bluebird Café. As a staff songwriter for Curb Magnatone Music Publishing, he composed several songs for the musical "Urban Cowboy" which opened on Broadway in March 2003 and was nominated for an Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Musical and a Tony Award for Best Original Score. He is also the co-founder, CEO, and one of the main site developers of www.SongU.com, which provides over 70 multi-level courses developed by award-winning songwriters in addition to online coaching, co-writing, industry connections, and pitching opportunities. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting Tip, Danny Arena, Song Form, Song Intro, Song Length

2012 USA Songwriting Competition Radio Podcast

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Apr 05, 2012 @04:29 PM

 

Tune in to the 2012 USA Songwriting Competition Podcast, featuring of the winners of the USA Songwriting Competition (past & present). Click on the audio player above to listen to the music (See Above)

Music featured in this podcast by:

Alexander Cardinale, singer-songwriter

Alexander Cardinale & Morgan Taylor – Traffic Lights (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Pop & Overall 2nd Prize)

Gabriel Mann – Lighted Up (2002 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Orly Forman & Yagel Sulchiner, performed by Orly – Boy on a Hill (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Molly Hunt, Troy Johnson & Jack Williams, performed by Molly Hunt – Go There (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Country & Overall 3rd Prize)

Simon Spire – A Four-Letter Word (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize Winner, Folk)

Nenna Yvonne - Go Around (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Ed Romanoff, Crit Harmon & Mary Gauthier – Breakfast for One on the 5th of July (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Lyrics)

Patrice Pike, Wayne Sutton, Sean Phillips & Darrell Phillips, performed by Patrice Pike and “Sister Seven” – My Three Wishes (2004 USA Songwriting Competition Overall Grand Prize)

Nianell - Finally (16th Annual USA Songwriting Competition First Prize, Gospel/Inspirational)

USA Songwriting Competition promotes the art & excellence in songwriting. For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, visit: http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, American Idol, USA Songwriting Competition, Billboard Charts, Alexander Cardinale, Radio Podcast, Gabriel Mann, Orly, Molly Hunt, Simon Spire, Nenna Yvonne, Ed Romanoff, Patrice Pike, Nianell

Getting Your First Big Yes In Songwriting

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @12:15 PM

Getting Your First Big Yes In Songwriting

By Molly-Ann Leikin

 Molly-Ann Leikin, Songwriting Co-writer, Song Marketing Consultant

This morning, as I took my walk up the hill behind my house, I realized that if I stacked all the no’s I’ve been told from day one, they would block the Alps.

 

On the other hand, the yeses would barely make it past my ankle.

 

Nonetheless, I am enjoying a great career in the music business.

 

Over the years, I’ve probably heard more no’s than most songwriters, because I wasn’t a groupie, I wore a bra, didn’t do drugs, and I wasn’t anybody’s daughter.

 

But after seven years of “you can’t be serious,” a publisher at Warner Brothers asked me to write a song for somebody, and I was back with it the next day at 7:24 a.m. Waiting on WB's front step, which is totally out of character for drive-around-the-block-once-then-split me, I was cool when WB guy rolled in at eleven. He didn’t use my song that time, but he appreciated my passion. After 398.2 days of this, he signed me a staffwriter.

 

Yes, I am talented. But everybody's talented. I just wanted it more.

 

Do you?

 

© 2012 Molly-Ann Leikin

Molly-Ann Leikin is an Emmy nominee. The author of “How to Write A Hit Song” and “How to Be A Hit Songwriter”, she has written themes and songs for over five dozen TV shows and movies, including “Violet” that won an Oscar. Through co-writing and song marketing consultations, four of Molly’s clients have Grammy nominations, another won an Emmy, and so far, with Molly’s help, over 6000 of her other lyricist and composer protégées have placed their work in TV shows, movies, on CD’s and in commercials. Molly would be happy to discuss a co-write or consultation with you: 800-851-6588 [email protected] www.songmd.com

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, go to: http://www.songwriting.net 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, Song writing, Songwriting, Warner Brothers, Molly-Ann Leikin, Song Marketing Consultant, Co-writer, First Big Yes

Songwriting Tip: Sharpen Your Music With The Flat Seven Chord

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Mon, Apr 02, 2012 @01:18 PM

SHARPEN YOUR MUSIC WITH THE FLAT SEVEN CHORD by Danny Arena

Danny Arena, Songwriter
There are seven standard chords that are part of every key in which you may be writing a song. In traditional theory, these are known as the "diatonic chords", but you can simply think of them as the chords we tend to gravitate towards first when writing music. The reason is simple - they are the ones we hear the most. However there are also some commonly used chords that are called non-diatonic that turn up in many hit songs. One of these so-called non-diatonic chords is called the flat seven (or flatted seventh) chord. It can be a valuable tool to have in your composer's toolbox.

Formation of the Flat Seven Chord 
The flat seven chord is formed by first determining the seventh note of the scale of the key in which you are writing your song. Lower this note by a half-step (also known as "flatting" the note) and you have the flat seven. For example, in the key of C, the flat seven would be a Bb chord. In the key of G, the flat seven chord would be an F major chord. 

How It's Used 
The flat seven is generally used in one of two ways. First, the flat seven chord can also be used as a "surprise" chord, where you set the listener up to hear a certain chord, but give them the flat seven chord instead as a "surprise". This is how Jimmy Webb first popularized the use of the flat seven chord (in fact, the flat seven chord is also known as the Jimmy Webb 7th). The bridge in the Grammy winning song "Beauty and the Beast" (songwriter - Menken/Ashman) uses the flat seven as a surprise chord as does the Faith Hill classic hit "This Kiss" (songwriter - R. Lerner/B. Chapman/A. Roboff) which incorporates the flat seven chord in the verse chord progression. 

An Example 
Let's say you are writing a song in the key of C and have the following chord progression for the verse (1 chord per measure): 

C F C F
Em Am F G

One way to surprise the listener would be to play a flat seven chord (Bb) instead of the F chord in the seventh measure. Another way to surprise the listener would be to play the Bb chord in the 8th measure after the F chord, and use an extra measure for the G chord.

So the next time you're looking for a little different twist on an old progression or just a different chord to start that chorus or bridge on, don't overlook the flat seven chord - it's really pretty sharp (sorry for the pun there...I couldn't resist). 

Hope to see you on the charts. 

-Danny

About Danny Arena

Danny Arena is a Tony Award nominated composer who has worked as a staff songwriter for Warner/Chappell Music and Curb Magnatone Music Publishing. He holds degrees from Rutgers University in both computer science and music composition. He is currently an Associate Professor at Volunteer State Community College in Nashville and has been a member of the faculty at Vanderbilt University as well as a guest lecturer at the Berklee College of Music and Belmont University. Together Danny and Sara collaborated on composing songs for the Broadway show "Urban Cowboy: The Musical" which was nominated for an Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Musical and a Tony Award for Best Original Score. He is also the co-founders of the online educational website www.SongU.com which provides multi-level songwriting courses developed and taught by award-winning songwriters, song feedback and mentoring, one-on-one song coaching, co-writing, unscreened pitching opportunities and more. For more information on USA Songwriting Competition, visit:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting Tip, songwrite, Flat Seven Chord

Songwriting Tip: Ya Gotta Move...Yourself !!

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 27, 2012 @03:03 PM

Songwriting Tip: Ya Gotta Move...Yourself !! 

By Mark Cawley

Mark Cawley, songwriter

One of the most valuable lessons I learned over years in writing for artists, writing with artists and taking direction from my publisher was to not study too hard.

I learned this the hard way! I’ll go way back for some examples. I was writing for a major publisher during the 90’s, and I knew that part of my job was to stay current. I would shoot for the biggest artists of the day and usually had a heads up on direction from my publisher, other writers and even producers.

I’ve always loved great singers and found it easy to hear their voice in my head when I was working on something to pitch for them. Rod Stewart, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Aretha Franklin, Wynonna, Chaka Khan...I was a channeling fool. For years cuts were coming along but the ones I really wanted were eluding me. I would listen to everything they’d done, groove, key, subject matter and try to nail something I could hear them doing. What I didn’t think about is a really, really great artist isn’t looking for “something that sounds just like them”.

During these years I can’t tell you how many songs were put on hold by the powers that be thinking the song ( and demo) sounded exactly like their artist. At the 11th hour something would usually go amiss. You may have been there. Everything looks perfect, time to start spending the money you’re going to see...nothing to it, I’ve done my homework, my 10,000 hours and damn it...I deserve it!

As you know you need a thick skin and crazy confidence to take the rejection this career will hand out so I would grieve for a time and then jump back in. Then a funny thing happened....

As I was writing for the market I was also getting with better and better co-writers. We had the same war stories but if we wrote long enough we would eventually say let’s forget it and just write what we want, something that we can walk away and say “ I don’t care if this ever get’s cut. Then they did. In a short period of time Tina, Joe, Chaka and Wynonna cut songs that didn’t sound remotely like ones written “for” them. All songs I was proud of. Sometimes it was a creative publisher who had the imagination to hear a song as the next step for an artist even when all the powers that be said they were nuts for sending them a song so different than what was being asked for. Sometimes it was using one of those people in your network, whatever it took to get the artist to hear it.

So the big lesson for me was a true artist is trying to move forward, not repeat themselves. They want to be challenged and they want to challenge a listener or fan. Usually they don’t know what form that will take until they hear it but if the song moved you first maybe you can move them and hopefully they can move a few million other people and then...you can take that to the bank!

© Mark Cawley, Nashville, TN 3/20/12


Mark Cawleys’ songs have appeared on more than 15 million records. Over a career based in LA, London and Nashville his songs have been recorded by an incredibly diverse range of artists. From Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, Diana Ross and Chaka Kahn to The Spice Girls, Tom Scott, Kathy Mattea, Paul Carrack, Will Downing and Pop Idol winners in the UK and around the world. He has had #1 records in the UK and throughout Europe as well as cut’s in Country, Jazz & R & B. His groundbreaking website “Song Journey” created with Hall of Fame writer Kye Fleming was the first to mentor writers from around the world one on one online. He is currently writing and publishing as well as helping writers and artists in the US, UK and Australia with a new one on one co-active coaching service. Visit www.idocoach.com for details. For more details on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to: http://www.songwriting.net

 

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Mark Cawley, Tina Turner, Joe Cocker, Wynonna, The Spice Girls, Kathy Mattea, Diana Ross and Chaka Kahn

Neon Hitch Speaks on Songwriting/Collaboration

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Thu, Mar 22, 2012 @12:46 PM

Neon Hitch, singer songwriter talks about her experience as a songwriter in collaboration with hit makers: 

USA Songwriting Competition caught up with Warner Brothers Recording Artist Neon Hitch at the Winter Music Conference in Miami Beach, Florida. She is a British singer and songwriter. She talked about songwriting and collaborations with hit makers such as Bruno Mars, Gym Class Heroes, 3OH!3 and Mike Posner. She had 2 songs that hit the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.

She was signed to Mike Skinner and Ted Mayhem's label, The Beats, before it closed down. She was later discovered on MySpace by Benny Blanco who flew her to New York to work with him. Their work together earned her a music publishing deal with EMI and a record deal with Warner Brothers Records. 

The Winter Music Conference is a weeklong electronic music conference, held every March since the mid-1980s in Miami Beach, Florida. 

The WMC is recognized for serving over 62,000 attendees from 70 countries in Miami Beach to get involved in the WMC week. Over 4,000 industry delegates attended, Record label representatives, publishers, and A&R attend the conference.

USA Songwriting Competition's event director Eddie Phoon (pictured below with Neon Hitch) spoke as a panelist at WMC Demo Listening Workshops and South Beach Sessions, which included legendary music producer Henry Stone. 

 

Singer Songwriter Neon Hitch With Event Director Eddie Phoon, at WMC (Winter Music Conference) in Miami Beach

For more information on the 17th Annual USA Songwriting Competition, please go to:http://www.songwriting.net

Tags: songwriter, Neon Hitch, singer, Warner Brothers, Bruno Mars, Gym Class Heroes, 3OH!3, Mike Posner

Music Gear: iRig™ MIX and DJ Rig, iPhone app with Hardware

Posted by Jessica Brandon on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @11:23 AM


 IK Multimedia at WMC (Winter Music Conference)

IK Multimedia showcased 2 new products (See Video above) at the 2012 WMC (Winter Music Conference) in Miami Beach on March 19, 2012:

iRig™ MIX
The first mobile mixer for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. iRig™ MIX is the first mobile mixer for iPhone, iPod touch or iPad devices. iRig MIX offers the same controls you would expect from a professional DJ mixer (crossfader, cues, EQ and volume controls, etc.) in an ultra-compact mobile mixer that can be used with a huge variety of iOS DJ mixing and other apps. iRig MIX is a DJ mixer that allows DJs to use a traditional setup with two devices (one plugged into each of the independent channels) OR a single iOS device. For the single iOS device setup, the output of the single device is split into dual-mono and sent to the individual channels. Additionally – for the first time on any DJ mixer - iRig MIX can be used for mixing any type of audio source (coming from mp3 players, CD players, etc.) with an iOS device using automatic tempo matching and beat syncing. This is accomplished with X-Sync, a feature that works in combination with the DJ Rig free app from IK Multimedia that is included with iRig MIX.


DJ Rig
The pro-quality DJ mixing app. DJ Rig is a full-featured, double-deck DJ mixing app for iPhone. DJ Rig provides instant song playback from the device's music library, tempo sync, sample-based pads, performance recording and an arsenal of high-quality DJ effects. Together with the iRig MIX, DJ Rig provides the most portable pro-quality setup for mobile DJs and musicians.

DJ Rig stands out from the crowd of DJ apps for its complete set of professional features including some that cannot be found in any other app such as X-Sync. This mode allows anybody to automatically synchronize the app audio with any other external audio source. DJ Rig “listens” to the device's audio input, determines its BPM tempo and syncs the app audio automatically. Read more about iRig™ MIX and DJ Rig at:  http://www.ikmultimedia.com/irigmix/moreinfo/djrig.php

Tags: songwriter, song writer, song write, Song writing, Songwriting, songwrite, Music Gear, iRig MIX, DJ Rig, iPhone app, Hardware, IK Multimedia